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Bioerodible Polypyrrole

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

Alexander Zelikin
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 45 Carleton St., E25-342, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA
Venkatram Shastri
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 45 Carleton St., E25-342, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA
David Lynn
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 45 Carleton St., E25-342, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA
Jian Farhadi
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Research Division, Kantonsspital Basel, Basel, Switzerland 4031
Ivan Martin
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, Research Division, Kantonsspital Basel, Basel, Switzerland 4031
Robert Langer
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 45 Carleton St., E25-342, Cambridge, MA, 02139, USA
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Abstract

Conductive polymers such as polypyrrole (Ppy) are potentially useful as an active interface for altering cellular processes and function. Their utilization in medically related applications however have been substantially held back by their non-degradable nature. Herein we report a novel approach to creation of bioerodible polypyrroles via modification of pyrrole beta-carbon with an ionizable moiety. It has been shown that the erosion rate of acid-bearing derivative of polypyrrole increases with pH, which is consistent with the pH dependent ionization of carboxylic acid group. The novel paradigm proposed for the creation of bioerodible polypyrroles allows for simple and efficient control over the erosion rate of the substrate independent of the polymer chain length, via the choice of the terminal ionizable group and its concentration along the polymer backbone.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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