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Bioactive Materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

L. L. Hench
Affiliation:
Bioglass® Research Center, Box J-413 JHMHC, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32610, USA
June Wilson
Affiliation:
Bioglass® Research Center, Box J-413 JHMHC, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32610, USA
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Abstract

Biomaterials can be classified in terms of their interfacial response with tissues: 1) nearly inert, 2) nearly inert microporous, 3) resorbable, and 4) surface active. Surface active biomaterials include bioactive glasses such as Bioglass®, bioactive glass-ceramics such as Ceravital® or A/W Glass-Ceramic, hydroxylapatite such as Calcitite® or bioactive composites such as Palavital® or stainless steel fiber reinforced Bioglass®. All of the above surface active biomaterials form an interfacial bond with adjacent tissue. However, the time dependence of bonding, strength of bond, mechanisms of bonding, and thickness of bonding zone differ. Depending upon composition, type of tissue, and type of load applied, and explanation for the compositional dependence is presented together with various medical and dental implant applications, including middle ear prostheses, maxillofacial reconstruction, endosseous ridge maintenance and augmentation, periodontal packing, and fixation of orthopedic joint prostheses.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1986

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References

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