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Band Engineering of Partially Exposed Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Xiaolei Liu
Affiliation:
Dept. of E.E.-Electrophysics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089
Zhicheng Luo
Affiliation:
Dept. of E.E.-Electrophysics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089
Song Han
Affiliation:
Dept. of E.E.-Electrophysics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089
Tao Tang
Affiliation:
Dept. of E.E.-Electrophysics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089
Daihua Zhang
Affiliation:
Dept. of E.E.-Electrophysics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089
Chongwu Zhou
Affiliation:
Dept. of E.E.-Electrophysics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089
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Abstract

We present a new approach to engineer the band structure of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors via selected area chemical gating. By exposing the center part or the contacts of the nanotube devices to oxidizing or reducing gases, a good control over the threshold voltage and subthreshold swing has been achieved. Our experiments reveal that NO2 shifts the threshold voltage higher while NH3 shifts it lower for both center-exposed and contact-exposed devices. However, modulations to the subthreshold swing are in opposite directions for center-exposed and contact-exposed devices: NO2 lowers the subthreshold swing of the contact-exposed devices, but increases that of the center-exposed devices; In contrast, NH3 reduces the subthreshold swing of the center-exposed devices, but increases that of the contact-exposed devices. A model has been developed based on Langmuir isotherm, and the experimental results can be well explained.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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References

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