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Atomic Hydrogen Effects on the Optical and Electrical Properties of Transparent Conducting Oxides For a-Si:H TFT-LCDs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Je-Hsiung Lan
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Center for Display Technology and Manufacturing, The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2108
Jerzy Kanicki
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Center for Display Technology and Manufacturing, The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2108
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Abstract

The effects of the atomic hydrogen treatment (H-treatment) of indium-tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films have been investigated. The atomic hydrogen was generated by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HW-CVD) technique. Experimental results have shown that AZO films are chemically very stable under the H-treatment; almost no variation in the optical transmittance and electrical resistivity was observed. On the contrary, ITO films, either prepared by sputtering with ex-situ or in-situ thermal-annealing, have shown severe optical and electrical degradation and surface whitening after the H-treatment. SEM studies of the H-treated ITO surfaces have revealed that the surface whitening was due to the increase in surface roughness and the formation of granule-like metallic balls. Auger electron spectroscopy has indicated that the balls were mainly composed of indium atoms and the areas between balls were rich in oxygen atoms. These results were confirmed by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements done on ITO before and after the H-treatment. Finally, we have demonstrated that a-SiO, deposited by PECVD will completely suppress the chemical reaction between ITO surfaces and atomic hydrogen generated by HW-CVD technique.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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References

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Atomic Hydrogen Effects on the Optical and Electrical Properties of Transparent Conducting Oxides For a-Si:H TFT-LCDs
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