Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-zqvvz Total loading time: 0.414 Render date: 2021-04-12T02:06:09.349Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Anisotropic Clay Aerogel Composite Materials

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Matthew D Gawryla
Affiliation:
mdg18@case.edu, Case Western Reserve University, Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
David A. Schiraldi
Affiliation:
mdg18@case.edu, Case Western Reserve University, Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
Corresponding
Get access

Abstract

Clay aerogel composites have been around for over 50 years but still they represent a relatively under studied class of materials. Clay aerogel composites have been made in our labs that have low densities, 0.05-0.1g/cm3, provide good thermal insulation, k 0.02W/mK, and are created through an environmentally benign process. The mechanical properties of the composites resemble those of typical foamed polymers such as expanded polystyrene and polyurethane, with compressive moduli ranging from 0.5MPa to 40MPa depending on composition. Aqueous solutions of clay and polymer are frozen in cylindrical molds and freezedried to create these foam-like materials. Typically there is no particular orientation to the often layered structure that results, however if frozen in a unidirectional manner, anisotropic materials can be made. In this paper we will discuss the effects of molecular weight on mechanical properties of various composites as well as discussing the orientated layered structure within the anisotropic materials.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

[1] Kistler, S. S., Nature 1931, 127, 741; S. S. Kistler, J. Phys. Chem. 1932, 36, 5210.1038/127741a0CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[2] Olphen, H. Van, Clay Miner. 1967, 15, 423435 10.1346/CCMN.1967.0150142CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[3] Somlai, L. S., Bandi, S. A., Mathias, L. J., Schiraldi, D. A., AICHE J. 2006, 52, 1162 10.1002/aic.10710CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[4] Gawryla, M. D., Nezamzadeh, M., Schiraldi, D. A., Green Chemistry, 2008, 10, 1078 10.1039/b807473aCrossRefGoogle Scholar
[5] Arndt, E., Gawryla, M. D., Schiraldi, D. A., J. Mater. Chem. 2007, 17, 3525 10.1039/b704114dCrossRefGoogle Scholar
[6] Finlay, K. A., Gawryla, M. D., Schiraldi, D. A., J. Indust. Eng. Chem. Res. 2008, 47, 615 10.1021/ie0705406CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[7] Gutierrez, M., Ferrer, M. L., Monte, F. del, Chem. Mater., 20, pg 634, 2008.10.1021/cm702028zCrossRefGoogle Scholar
[8] Gutierrez, M. C., Garcia-Carvajal, Z. Y., Hortiguela, M. J., Yuste, L., Rojo, F., Ferrer, M. L., Monte, F. del, Adv. Funct. Mater. 2007, 17, 35053515 10.1002/adfm.200700093CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[9] Easterling, K. E., Harrysson, R., Gibson, L. J., Ashby, M. F.; “On the mechanics of balsa and other woodsProc. R. Soc. Lond. A, 383, pg 31, 1982.10.1098/rspa.1982.0118CrossRefGoogle Scholar
[10] Gibson, L. J., Ashby, M. F.; “Cellular Solids–Structure and Properties 2nd Ed.” Cambridge Univ. Press, 152, 1997.10.1017/CBO9781139878326CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 33 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 12th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Anisotropic Clay Aerogel Composite Materials
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Anisotropic Clay Aerogel Composite Materials
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Anisotropic Clay Aerogel Composite Materials
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *