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Phase separation and transformation of binary immiscible systems in molten core-derived optical fibers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 March 2020

Matthew Tuggle
Affiliation:
Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, 91 Technology Drive, Anderson, SC, 29625, USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, 295 Sirrine Hall, Clemson, SC29634, USA
Thomas W. Hawkins
Affiliation:
Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, 91 Technology Drive, Anderson, SC, 29625, USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, 295 Sirrine Hall, Clemson, SC29634, USA
Courtney Kucera
Affiliation:
Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, 91 Technology Drive, Anderson, SC, 29625, USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, 295 Sirrine Hall, Clemson, SC29634, USA
Nathaniel Huygen
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, 295 Sirrine Hall, Clemson, SC29634, USA National Brick Research Center, Clemson University, 91 Technology Drive, Anderson, SC, 29625, USA
Artis Brasovs
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, 295 Sirrine Hall, Clemson, SC29634, USA
Konstantin Kornev
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, 295 Sirrine Hall, Clemson, SC29634, USA
John Ballato
Affiliation:
Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, 91 Technology Drive, Anderson, SC, 29625, USA Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, 295 Sirrine Hall, Clemson, SC29634, USA
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Abstract

This work studies phase-separated fibers in the CaO–SiO2 and NiO–SiO2 systems. The nature of the phase-separated microstructures and underlying phase equilibria are discussed, including dimensionality, composition, and phase formation as well as the realization of ferrimagnetic behavior in the NiO–SiO2 fibers based on the formation of metallic Ni inclusions. In addition to understanding the composition/processing relationships in these systems, the work represents a step forward toward novel magneto-optic fibers. It is important to understand the underlying materials science in order to advance the properties of novel optical fibers possessing engineered heterogeneities in the core.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2020

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References

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Tuggle et al. supplementary material

Tuggle et al. supplementary material

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