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Application of iron (III) meso-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin-methylene blue strips for the detection and quantification of H2O2 in aqueous and pharmaceutical fluids

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2019

Olayemi J. Fakayode
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, P. O. Box 17011, Doornfontein 2028, Johannesburg, South Africa Centre for Nanomaterials Science Research, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
El Hadji Mamour Sakho
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, P. O. Box 17011, Doornfontein 2028, Johannesburg, South Africa Centre for Nanomaterials Science Research, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Sandile P. Songca
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, University of Zululand, Private bag X1001, Kwadlangezwa, 3886, South Africa
Oluwatobi S. Oluwafemi
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, P. O. Box 17011, Doornfontein 2028, Johannesburg, South Africa Centre for Nanomaterials Science Research, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
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Abstract

In this report, a facile system consisting of iron (III) meso-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin-methylene blue dye hybrid immobilized on a disposable paper strip was used to detect and sense H2O2 in aqueous solutions via a low-cost pixelometric imaging technique. The new technology was employed to evaluate the level of H2O2 in a self-administering 30%-labeled commercial H2O2 disinfectant solution. The result showed that the concentration of H2O2 in the tested pharmaceutical sample solution deviated from the label by 92.37%. The current approach provides a simple low-cost resolution for the rapid detection and quantification of H2O2 in aqueous solution and pharmaceutical fluids.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2019 

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Application of iron (III) meso-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin-methylene blue strips for the detection and quantification of H2O2 in aqueous and pharmaceutical fluids
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