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        Silver Nanoparticles: Properties, Synthesis Techniques, Characterizations, Antibacterial and Anticancer Studies by Shweta Rajawat and M.M. Malik
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        Silver Nanoparticles: Properties, Synthesis Techniques, Characterizations, Antibacterial and Anticancer Studies by Shweta Rajawat and M.M. Malik
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Footnotes

ASME Press, 2018 184 pages, $99.00 ISBN 978–0-791–860–458

This book provides a concise treatment of the properties, characterization techniques, preparation methods based on green chemistry, and biomedical applications of silver nanoparticles, with a focus on their antimicrobial and antitumor properties.

The authors begin with historical anecdotes of the medicinal use of silver in various forms, including colloidal silver and silver compounds. A brief introduction to the birth of nanotechnology follows, with succinct discussion on the unique properties of nano-sized materials compared to bulk materials, with a specific focus on silver nanoparticles. Green synthesis techniques are espoused, based on their more environmentally friendly principles, to reduce the usage of or eliminate the production of toxic substances.

The book progresses as an academic thesis by reviewing literature covering physical, chemical, and biological approaches for synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Readers who are familiar with synthesis techniques of nanoparticles may be better served with more current reviews in journals that also cover composite materials incorporating nano silver. However, readers who are seeking a brief introduction to this topic will find the discussion easy to follow.

The principles of green chemistry are further explored in the third and fourth chapters. Plant extracts from tea leaves, garlic, and onion are used as capping agents and/or reducing agents to form metallic silver nanoparticles. Furthermore, the use of silver precursors from discarded photographic and x-ray films are discussed in detail. Synthesis techniques covered include electrolytic deposition and the Tollens test. The silver nanomaterials are characterized by x-ray powder diffraction, UV-visible spectrophotometry, and electron microscopy, while challenge tests involving various microbes as well as two strains of tumor cells (MCF-7 and HeLa) demonstrate significant potency.

Readers who are actively working with nanoparticle synthesis will find the discussion easy to follow. This book is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, as well as researchers who are interested in the field.

Reviewer: Maxine Yee, University of Nottingham Malaysia.