Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Graphene: Fabrication, Characterizations, Properties and Applications by Hongwei Zhu, Zhiping Xu, Dan Xie, and Ying Fang, Editors
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Graphene: Fabrication, Characterizations, Properties and Applications by Hongwei Zhu, Zhiping Xu, Dan Xie, and Ying Fang, Editors
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Graphene: Fabrication, Characterizations, Properties and Applications by Hongwei Zhu, Zhiping Xu, Dan Xie, and Ying Fang, Editors
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Footnotes

Academic Press (Elsevier), 2017 272 pages, $150.00 (e-book $150.00) ISBN 9780128126516

The English version of this book is an update to the Chinese version published in 2011. A wide range of books on graphene dealing with fundamentals to more advanced levels have appeared in the market after the award of the Nobel Prize to A. Geim and K.S. Novoselov. Some of those books focus on either science or technology, but this one concentrates on materials science and engineering, giving a comprehensive review of the subject.

The first chapter discusses the basic structure and properties of graphene. It contains short descriptions of carbon allotropes, with a historical account of the discovery of graphene, which is followed by illustrations on the structure and properties of graphene. Chapter 2 limits the discussions to the physical properties of graphene, such as refraction, thermal, and electrical conductivities, and introduces graphene structural information as derived from optical microscopy, electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy.

Chapter 3 covers multidimensional assemblies of graphene, with a predominant focus on oxides. It then discusses one-dimensional (1D), 2D, and 3D structural materials, large-scale synthesis of graphene films, template-directed methods, graphene-based macrostructures, and chemical and electrochemical reduction of graphene oxides. Chapter 4 depicts electronic, optical, mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties of graphene. Chapter 5 describes electronic devices, including solar cells and photodetectors.

Chapters 6 and 7 orient the reader to graphene-based sensors and flexible energy-storage devices. The advantages of graphene for gas sensing are well discussed; however, the literature coverage is not exhaustive. Chapter 8 covers graphene composites made with either polymer or non-polymeric matrices. Chapter 9 discusses biomedical applications such as graphene-based biosensors, graphene derivative-based functional carriers, and biosafety. The last chapter focuses on potential applications. Several exciting areas such as self-powered micromotors, knitted textiles, sensors and actuators, superhydrophobic surfaces, evolution of new 2D structures, and the need for low-cost synthesis of graphene are emphasized.

This is a specialized book reviewing the developments in select areas of graph-ene. There is a subject index at the end of the book for easy selection of topics. Although the book contains a number of illustrative figures, they are in black and white with limited clarity, and the text contains some structural errors (e.g., Chapter 1 starts with “… as mentioned in the previous chapter” when there is no chapter preceding it). The book aims to stimulate graduate students in materials science and engineering for further research in graphene. It is a good supplemental book for graduate students and for those interested in the area of graphene.

Reviewer: K.S.V. Santhanam is a professor in the School of Chemistry and Materials Science at Rochester Institute of Technology, USA.