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The evolution of magnetocaloric heat-pump devices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 April 2018

Carl Zimm
Affiliation:
Astronautics Technology Center, Astronautics Corporation of America, USA; c.zimm@astronautics.com
Andre Boeder
Affiliation:
Astronautics Technology Center, Astronautics Corporation of America, USA; a.boeder@astronautics.com
Bryant Mueller
Affiliation:
Astronautics Technology Center, Astronautics Corporation of America, USA; b.mueller@astronautics.com
Kyle Rule
Affiliation:
Astronautics Technology Center, Astronautics Corporation of America, USA
Steven L. Russek
Affiliation:
Astronautics Technology Center, Astronautics Corporation of America, USA; s.russek@astronautics.com
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Abstract

Magnetocaloric heat pumps (MHPs) use the solid-state magnetocaloric effect (MCE) to move heat from cold to hot using an intermediate heat-transfer fluid. Work input is required to drive the MCE via a change in a magnetic field. Work input is also required to drive the heat-transfer fluid flow. Thus design of a MHP involves the coupling of materials, magnetics, heat transfer, and fluid flow. We discuss design principles and operational devices that have brought this technology toward technical feasibility, and the approaches to overcome remaining hurdles to commercial feasibility.

Type
Caloric Effects in Ferroic Materials
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2018 

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