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Observation of atomic-like transition in Sapphire crystal by deep UV photoluminescence spectroscopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 April 2020

Nikesh Maharjan
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, NY 11210, USA
Mim Lal Nakarmi
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, Brooklyn, NY 11210, USA
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Abstract

Deep UV photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was employed to study optical properties of a sapphire substrate sample. The sample was photo-excited by the third harmonic laser of a Ti:sapphire pulse laser at wavelength ~ 266 nm which is a below bandgap excitation. In the low temperature (12 K) PL measurement, we observed two sharp atomic-like emissions in the ultraviolet region with peaks at 3.361 eV and 3.315 eV with spectral line-width of 0.85 and 3.30 nm respectively, in the PL spectrum. We performed temperature and power-dependent PL measurements of the sample and observed that the emission peak positions did not change with changing excitation power and sample temperature. We also performed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for chemical composition analysis of the sample to explore the origin of the atomic-like emission that could be used for single photon sources for quantum information technology. We will discuss a possible electronic transition and its origin in sapphire.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2020

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