Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Communal Harmony as Governmentality: Reciprocity, peace-keeping, state legitimacy, and citizenship in contemporary India*

  • NANDAGOPAL R. MENON (a1)

Abstract

Debates about secularism in post-independence India have often revolved around the visions of two of the country's founding fathers—M. K. Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru. A sharp distinction is drawn between them by those who argue that the Gandhian model (or, what in common parlance and state discourses is called communal harmony) stems from Indian cultural and religious values, and lies beyond the realm of the state. The Nehruvian model, however, is a state project through and through. This article transcends this dichotomy to show that the association of Nehru and Gandhi with these models does not necessarily mean that secularism and communal harmony faithfully reflect their ideas and, despite the differences in their aims and methods, both models are united in the discourses and practices of the state as strategies of ‘governmentality’. After redefining the core of communal harmony as reciprocity (rather than tolerance), I show how it is performed, how it supplements the state's efforts to keep the peace in a religiously plural society by the force of law, and shores up the state's legitimacy deficit. However, the state's simultaneous involvement in Nehruvian and Gandhian projects is not an innocuous fact because it undermines the state's constitutional and secular obligations to non-discriminatory citizenship in the Indian nation. The argument is that the state's endorsement of dargah-centred Islamic piety as an exemplary site of communal harmony and particular ideas of the Indian nation legitimized by communal harmony ‘problematizes’ the national belonging of certain kinds of pious Muslims.

Copyright

Footnotes

Hide All
*

Non-incriminating thanks is due to Patrick Eisenlohr, Martijn Oosterbaan, Roschanack Shaery, the two anonymous reviewers of Modern Asian Studies, and my former colleagues at the Department of Cultural Anthropology, Utrecht University. A special thanks to Sarbari Sinha for helping me edit this article.

Footnotes

References

Hide All

1 Casanova, Jose, Public Religions in the Modern World (University of Chicago Press: Chicago, 1994); Asad, Talal, Formations of the Secular: Christianity, Islam and Modernity (Stanford University Press: California, 2003); Connolly, William E., Why I Am Not a Secularist (University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis, 1999); Taylor, Charles, A Secular Age (Harvard University Press: Massachusetts, 2007).

2 Navaro-Yashin, Yael, Faces of the State: Secularism and Public Life in Turkey (Princeton University Press: Princeton, 2002); Agrama, Hussein Ali, Questioning Secularism: Islam, Sovereignty and the Rule of Law in Egypt (Chicago University Press: Chicago, 2012).

3 Cannell, Fenella, ‘The anthropology of secularism’, Annual Review of Anthropology, 39, 2010, pp. 85100.

4 Khilnani, Sunil, ‘Nehru's faith’, in Dingwaney Needham, Anuradha and Sunder Rajan, Rajeswari (eds), The Crisis of Secularism in India (Duke University Press: Durham, 2007), pp. 89103.

5 Foucault, Michel, ‘Governmentality’, in Burchell, Graham, Gordon, Colin and Miller, Peter (eds), The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality (University of Chicago Press: Chicago, 1991), pp. 87104.

6 Foucault, Michel, Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth. Essential Works of Foucault, 1954–1984, Volume One (Penguin Books: London, 2000), pp. 117119.

7 Syed Muthahar Saqf, ‘“Nonbu kanji”, a noble thing that paves way for communal harmony’, The Hindu, 21 September 2009, http://www.hindu.com/2009/09/21/stories/2009092150900200.htm [accessed 10 June 2011]; Daijiworld Media Network, ‘Unique example of unity: Christians join Hindus in voluntary work at temple’, 2011, http://www.daijiworld.com/news/news_disp.asp?n_id = 99765 [accessed 10 June 2011]; IANS, ‘A madrassa starts yoga, propagates communal harmony’, Deccan Herald, 24 December 2010, http://www.deccanherald.com/content/123371/a-madrassa-starts-yoga-propagates.html [accessed 10 June 2011]; Newsxlive, ‘Muslim mason sets example of communal harmony’, 13 November 2009, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v = tzFeRokSqr8&feature = feedlik_more [accessed 10 June 2011].

8 Scott, David, Conscripts of Modernity: The Tragedy of Colonial Enlightenment (Duke University Press: Durham, 2004), p. 4.

9 Anuradha Dingwaney Needham and Rajeswari Sunder Rajan, ‘Introduction’, in Needham and Rajan (eds), The Crisis of Secularism in India, p. 20; Bhargava, Rajeev, ‘The distinctiveness of Indian secularism’, in Srinivasan, T. N. (ed.), The Future of Secularism (Oxford University Press: New Delhi, 2007), p. 29.

10 Interestingly, the use of the word ‘secular’ in Indian everyday life often suggests something closer to a sense of balancing the interests of various social groups. See Hansen, Thomas Blom, ‘Secular speech and popular passions: The antinomies of Indian secularism’, in Sullivan, Winnifred Fallers, Yelle, Robert A. and Taussig-Rubbo, Matteo (eds), After Secular Law (Stanford University Press: Stanford, 2011), pp. 261281.

11 Pandey, Gyanendra, The Construction of Communalism in Colonial North India (Oxford University Press: New Delhi, 1990).

12 Nandy, Ashis, ‘The political culture of the Indian state’, Daedalus, 118, 4, 1989, pp. 126; Nandy, Ashis, ‘The politics of secularism and the recovery of religious toleration’, in Bhargava, Rajeev (ed.), Secularism and Its Critics (Oxford University Press: New Delhi, 1998), pp. 321344; Ashis Nandy, ‘Closing the debate on secularism: A personal statement’, in Needham and Rajan (eds), The Crisis of Secularism in India, pp. 107–117.

13 Rajeev Bhargava, ‘What is secularism for’, in Bhargava (ed.), Secularism and Its Critics, pp. 486–542; Bhargava, ‘The distinctiveness of Indian secularism’.

14 van der Veer, Peter, Religious Nationalism: Hindus and Muslims in India (University of California Press: Berkeley, 1994), p. 23.

15 Foucault, ‘Governmentality’, p. 95.

16 Pandey, The Construction of Communalism in Colonial North India, pp. 6–7.

17 Brown, Wendy, Regulating Aversion: Tolerance in the Age of Identity and Empire (Princeton University Press: Princeton, 2006), p. 83.

18 Triloki Nath Madan, ‘Secularism in its place’, in Bhargava (ed.), Secularism and Its Critics, pp. 297–320; Nandy, ‘The political culture of the Indian state’; Nandy, ‘The politics of secularism’; Nandy, Ashis, ‘The twilight of certitudes: secularism, Hindu nationalism and other masks of deculturation’, Postcolonial Studies, 1, 3, 1998, pp. 283298; Nandy, ‘Closing the debate on secularism’.

19 Bhargava, ‘What is secularism for’; Bhargava, ‘The distinctiveness of Indian secularism’; Bhargava, Rajeev, ‘State, religious diversity, and the crisis of secularism’, The Hedgehog Review, 12, 3, 2010, pp. 822.

20 Akeel Bilgrami, ‘Secularism, nationalism and modernity’, in Bhargava (ed.), Secularism and Its Critics, pp. 380–417; Partha Chatterjee, ‘Secularism and tolerance’, in Bhargava (ed.), Secularism and Its Critics, pp. 345–379; Partha Chatterjee, ‘The contradictions of secularism’, in Needham and Rajan (eds), The Crisis of Secularism in India, pp. 141–156.

21 Chatterjee, ‘Secularism and tolerance’, pp. 358–366, 372–379; Chatterjee, ‘The contradictions of secularism’, p. 154, emphasis in the original.

22 Bilgrami, ‘Secularism, nationalism and modernity’, p. 399.

23 Bhargava, ‘The distinctiveness of Indian secularism’, p. 20.

24 Ibid, pp. 29–30.

25 Bhargava, ‘State, religious diversity and the crisis of secularism’, pp. 15 and 19.

26 Madan, ‘Secularism in its place’; Nandy, ‘The political culture of the Indian state’; Nandy, ‘The politics of secularism’; Nandy, ‘The twilight of certitudes’; Nandy, ‘Closing the debate on secularism.’

27 Madan, ‘Secularism in its place’, p. 300; Nandy, ‘The politics of secularism’, p. 322.

28 Madan, ‘Secularism in its place’, p. 309; Nandy, ‘The twilight of certitudes’, p. 284.

29 Nandy, ‘The political culture of the Indian state’, p. 5.

30 Madan, ‘Secularism in its place’, p. 314; Nandy, ‘The politics of secularism’; Nandy ‘The twilight of certitudes’; Nandy, ‘Closing the debate on secularism’, p. 117.

31 Kaviraj, Sudipta, ‘On the enchantment of the state: Indian thought on the role of the state in the narrative of modernity’, European Journal of Sociology, 46, 2, 2005, p. 289.

32 Mantena, Karuna, ‘On Gandhi's critique of the state: sources, contexts, conjectures’, Modern Intellectual History, 9, 3, 2012, pp. 535563.

33 Gandhi, Mohandas Karamchand, The Way to Communal Harmony (Navajivan Publishing House: Ahmedabad, 1963), p. 11.

34 Skaria, Ajay, ‘No politics without religion: Of secularism and Gandhi’, in Lal, Vinay (ed.), Political Hinduism: The Religious Imagination in Public Spheres (Oxford University Press: New Delhi, 2009), p. 183. Ethnographies of Hindu–Muslim neighbourhoods have provided a more complex picture of living together that goes beyond the polarities of either violence or harmonious agreement. Instead the awareness of a future together is rooted in an acknowledgement of discord and animosity. See Das, Veena, ‘Moral and spiritual striving in the everyday: To be a Muslim in contemporary India’, in Pandian, Anand and Ali, Daud (eds), Ethical Life in South Asia (Oxford University Press: New Delhi), pp. 232252.

35 Nandy, ‘The politics of secularism’, p. 327, emphasis in the original.

36 Van der Veer, Religious Nationalism, pp. 66–70; van der Veer, Peter, Imperial Encounters: Religion and Modernity in India and Britain (Princeton University Press: Princeton, 2001), pp. 6677; van der Veer, Peter, ‘Playing or praying: A Sufi saint's day in Surat’, Journal of Asian Studies, 51, 3, 1992, pp. 545564; van der Veer, Peter, ‘Syncretism, multiculturalism and the discourse of tolerance’, in Stewart, Charles and Shaw, Rosalind (eds), Syncretism/Anti-Syncretism: The Politics of Religious Synthesis (Routledge: London, 1994), pp. 196211.

37 Skaria, Ajay, ‘Gandhi's politics: liberalism and the question of the Ashram, The South Atlantic Quarterly, 101, 4, 2002, p. 978.

38 Skaria, ‘No politics without religion’, p. 182.

39 Cited in Mufti, Aamir R., ‘Auerbach in Istanbul: Edward Said, secular criticism, and the questions of minority culture’, Critical Inquiry, 25, 1, 1998, p. 115.

40 Nandy, ‘The politics of secularism’, p. 344, emphasis in the original.

41 Mauss, Marcel, The Gift: The Form and Reason for Exchange in Archaic Societies (Routledge: London, 1990), p. 87.

42 Derrida, Jacques, Given Time: I. Counterfeit Money (University of Chicago Press: Chicago, 1992).

43 Mauss, The Gift, pp. 70–77; Marriott, McKim, ‘Hindu transactions: Diversity without dualism’, in Kapferer, Bruce (ed.), Transaction and Meaning: Directions in the Anthropology of Exchange and Symbolic Behaviour (Institute for the Study of Human Issues: Philadelphia, 1976), p. 109. See also Parry, Jonathan, ‘The moral perils of exchange’, in Parry, Jonathan and Bloch, Maurice (eds), Money and the Morality of Exchange (Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, 1989), pp. 6493.

44 Gandhi, The Way to Communal Harmony, p. 32, emphasis added.

45 Ibid, p. 16, p. 24, passim.

46 Sahlins, Marshall, Stone Age Economics (Aldine Publishing Company: New York, 1972), p. 169.

47 Ibid, p. 170.

48 Devji, Faisal, The Impossible Indian: Gandhi and the Temptation of Violence (Harvard University Press: Massachusetts, 2012), pp. 151184.

49 Dipesh Chakrabarty, ‘Subaltern studies in retrospect and reminiscence’, Economic and Political Weekly, 23 March 2013, pp. 24–25.

50 I am not insinuating that this vision is somehow less historically accurate than that which ‘secular histories’ advance or that the votaries of communal harmony are ‘inventing traditions’. Neither am I suggesting that Nandy's and Gandhi's versions of Indian history are ‘true’. First, this article is not concerned with the authenticity or lack of it in such claims. Second, I would like to stress the contextuality and selectivity of every historical interpretation, including ‘secular’ ones. In this regard, see Fasolt, Constantin, The Limits of History (University of Chicago Press: Chicago, 2004); Charles Hirschkind, ‘Tradition, myth, and historical fact in contemporary Islam’, ISIM Newsletter, September 2001, p. 18. For ‘invented traditions’, see Hobsbawm, Eric and Ranger, Terence (eds), The Invention of Tradition (Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, 1988).

51 Brown, Regulating Aversion, pp. 90–91.

52 P. Manivannan and Sunil Agarwal, ‘A factual account of the violence in Mysore city, July 2009 (official version)’, http://www.milligazette.com/dailyupdate/2009/20090814_001_police_version_Mysore_riot_Muslims.htm, [accessed 6 June 2014]. P. Manivannan and Sunil Agarwal were, respectively, the deputy commissioner and district magistrate, and the city police commissioner of Mysore at the time of the riots. The reference is to the report on the riots they issued in their capacity as senior officials of the state administration of Mysore.

53 Mohammed Riyas Pasha, ‘Mysore police attacks protesting Muslims: Popular Front's reply to police’, 24 July 2009, http://www.milligazette.com/dailyupdate/2009/20090725_002_Mysore_police_attacks_protesting_Muslims_Popular_Fronts_reply_Police.htm, [accessed 6 June 2014].

54 Cited in T.A. Johnson, ‘3 dead, 18 hurt in Mysore communal crash’, in Indian Express, 3 July 2009, http://www.indianexpress.com/news/3-dead-18-hurt-in-mysore-communal-clash/484435/0 [accessed 6 June 2014].

55 Manivannan and Agarwal, ‘A factual account of the violence in Mysore city, July 2009 (official version)’; Pasha, ‘Mysore police attacks protesting Muslims: Popular Front's reply to police’.

56 Cited in Johnson, ‘3 dead, 18 hurt in Mysore communal crash’.

57 The Hindu, ‘Sadbhavana rally in riot-affected areas’, 29 August 2009, http://www.hindu.com/2009/08/29/stories/2009082957620300.htm, [accessed 6 June 2014].

58 Ibid.

59 The Hindu, ‘Children take out march for communal harmony’, 2 September 2009, http://www.hindu.com/2009/09/02/stories/2009090250520200.htm, [accessed 6 June 2014].

60 Rajasthan Patrika, ‘Bacchen sampradayik sauhard ke sacchhe dooth (Children are the true messengers of communal harmony)’, 2 September 2009, http://nfch.nic.in/, [accessed 6 June 2014].

61 Deccan Herald, ‘Four agents ensure peace’, 2 September 2009, http://nfch.nic.in/, [accessed 6 June 2014].

62 The Hindu, ‘Need to respect all religions stressed’, 2 September 2009, http://www.hindu.com/2009/09/02/stories/2009090251520300.htm, [accessed 6 June 2014].

63 Deccan Herald, ‘Four agents ensure peace’.

64 Engineer, Asghar Ali, Communal Riots After Independence: A Comprehensive Account (Shipra Publications: New Delhi, 2004), p. 54.

65 Manor, James, ‘Southern discomfort: The BJP in Karnataka’, in Hansen, Thomas Blom and Jaffrelot, Christophe (eds), The BJP and the Compulsions of Politics in India (Oxford University Press: New Delhi, 1998), p. 182.

66 Menon, Nivedita and Nigam, Aditya, Power and Contestation: India Since 1989 (Zed Books: London, 2007), p. 53.

67 Janaki Nair, ‘“Memories of underdevelopment”: Language and its identities in contemporary Karnataka’, Economic and Political Weekly, 12–19 October 1996, pp. 2813–2814; Asghar Ali Engineer, ‘Bangalore violence: linguistic or communal?’, Economic and Political Weekly, 29 October 1994, pp. 2854–2858.

68 Brass, Paul R., Theft of an Idol: Text and Context in the Representation of Collective Violence (Princeton University Press: Princeton, 1997), pp. 262267.

69 Ibid, p. 6.

70 Ibid, p. 9.

71 Ibid; see also Brass, Paul R., The Production of Hindu–Muslim violence in Contemporary India (University of Washington Press: Washington, 2003).

72 Brass, Theft of an Idol, p. 284.

73 Freitag, Sandria B., Collective Action and Community: Public Arenas and the Emergence of Communalism in North India (University of California Press: Berkeley, 1989).

74 Chakrabarty, ‘Subaltern studies in retrospect and reminiscence’, p. 27.

75 Ministry of Home Affairs, Guidelines on Communal Harmony, 2008, http://www.mha.nic.in/hindi/sites/upload_files/mhahindi/files/pdf/ComHor141008.pdf [accessed 8 July 2014], p. 23.

76 Ibid, p. 8.

77 National Foundation for Communal Harmony, http://nfch.nic.in/, [accessed 7 June 2014].

78 Butler, Judith, Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity (Routledge: London, 1990).

79 National Foundation for Communal Harmony, Annual Report 2007–08, http://nfch.nic.in/, [accessed 7 June 2014], p. 10.

80 Ministry of Home Affairs, Guidelines on Communal Harmony, p. 18.

81 National Foundation for Communal Harmony, Annual Report 2007–08, pp. 8–9.

82 Das, Veena, ‘Voices of Children’, Daedalus, 118, 4, 1989, p. 264.

83 Pandey, The Construction of Communalism in Colonial North India.

84 Ibid, pp. 6–7.

85 Pasha, ‘Mysore police attacks protesting Muslims: Popular Front's reply to police’.

86 Brown, Regulating Aversion, pp. 15–16.

87 Ibid, p. 99.

88 Varshney, Ashutosh, Ethnic Conflict and Civic Life: Hindus and Muslims in India (Yale University Press: New Haven, 2002).

89 Ibid, p. 9, emphasis in the original.

90 Ibid, p. 4.

91 Foucault, ‘Governmentality’, p. 95.

92 Anderson, Benedict, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism (Verso: London, 2006).

93 Foucault, Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth, pp. 117–119.

94 Ahmad, Imtiaz, Modernisation and Social Change Among Muslims in India (Manohar Publishers: New Delhi, 1981), p. VII; Gottschalk, Peter, ‘Mapping Muslims: categories of evolutionary difference and interaction in South Asia’, in Ahmad, Imtiaz and Reifeld, Helmut (eds), Lived Islam in South Asia: Adaptation, Accommodation and Conflict (Social Science Press: New Delhi, 2004), pp. 317; see also Ahmad, Aziz, An Intellectual History of Islam in India (University of Edinburgh Press: Edinburgh, 1969), p. 44; Roy, Asim K., The Islamic Syncretic Tradition in Bengal (Princeton University Press: Princeton, 1983).

95 Ahmad, Imtiaz, Ritual and Religion Among Muslims in India (Manohar Publishers: New Delhi, 1981), p. 7.

96 Eaton, Richard M., Sufis of Bijapur, 1300–1700: Social Roles of Sufis in Medieval India (Princeton University Press: Princeton, 1978); Eaton, Richard M., Rise of Islam and the Bengal Frontier: 1204–1760 (University of California Press: Berkeley, 1993); Gilmartin, David, Empire and Islam: Punjab and the Making of Pakistan (Oxford University Press: New Delhi, 1988).

97 However, Van der Veer notes in ‘Syncretism, multiculturalism and the discourse of tolerance’ (p. 195) that though Hindus do visit dargahs with prayers, it does not denote an attribution of equal status to their religion and Islam, but ‘seems to be an incorporation of saint worship as a lower, impure practice in a Hindu worldview’.

98 Gottschalk, Peter, Beyond Hindu and Muslim: Multiple Identity in Narratives from Village India (Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2000), pp. 135172.

99 Ahmad, Modernisation and Social Change Among Muslims in India, p. VII.

100 Robinson, Francis, Islam and Muslim History in South Asia (Oxford University Press: New Delhi, 2000), p. 47.

101 National Foundation for Communal Harmony, Annual Report 2007–08, p. 8.

102 Ibid.

103 Nauchandi Mela, http://www.freewebs.com/nauchandimeerut/nauchandi.htm, [accessed 2 August 2014].

104 Metcalf, Barbara Daly, Islamic Revival in British India: Deoband 1860–1900 (Princeton University Press: Princeton, 1982); Sanyal, Usha, Devotional Islam and Politics in British India: Ahmad Riza Khan Barelwi and His Movement, 1870–1920 (Oxford University Press: New Delhi, 1996).

105 Ingram, Brannon, ‘Sufis, scholars and scapegoats: Rashid Ahmad Gangohi (d. 1905) and the Deobandi critique of Sufism’, The Muslim World, 99, 3, 2009, pp. 478501; Naeem, Fuad S., ‘Sufism and revivalism in south Asia: Mawlana Ashraf Ali Thanwi of Deoband and Mawlana Ahmad Raza Khan of Bareilly and their paradigms of Islamic revivalism’, The Muslim World, 99, 3, 2009, pp. 435451; de Jong, Frederick and Radtke, Bernd (eds), Islamic Mysticism Contested: Thirteen Centuries of Controversies and Polemics (Brill: Leiden, 2009).

106 Van der Veer, ‘Playing or praying’, p. 545.

107 Simon Baljon, Johannes Marinus, ‘Shah Waliullah and the Dargah’, in Troll, Christian W. (ed.), Muslim Shrines in India: Their Character, History and Significance (Oxford University Press: New Delhi, 1989), pp.189197.

108 Metcalf, Islamic Revival, pp. 16–86.

109 Sikand, Yoginder, ‘Stoking the flames: Intra-Muslim rivalries in India and the Saudi connection’, Comparative Studies in South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, 27, 1, 2007, p. 95.

110 Sikand, ‘Stoking the flames’, p. 102.

111 Ibid, p. 101.

112 Ibid, p. 108.

113 Ibid, p. 101.

114 However, historical evidence suggests that one of the main characteristic positions of the ‘Wahhabis’—the rejection of taqlīd (imitation) of the four canonical Sunni schools of law and the espousal of ijtihad (interpretation) of the Qur’an and hadīth—is actually derived from exposure to Ahl-e Hadīth teaching in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Hence an exchange of ideas, and not a one-sided influence, seems to be a more factually credible argument. See Lacroix, Stephane, ‘Between revolution and apoliticism: Nasir al-Din al-Albani and his impact on the shaping of contemporary Salafism’, in Meijer, Roel (ed.), Global Salafism: Islam's New Religious Movement (Hurst & Company: London, 2009), p. 62.

115 Mahmood, Saba, Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject (Princeton University Press: Princeton, 2004); Hirschkind, Charles, The Ethical Soundscape: Cassette Sermons and Islamic Counterpublics (Columbia University Press: New York, 2006).

116 Foucault, Ethics: Subjectivity and Truth, pp. 117–119.

117 Foucault, Michel, ‘The concern for truth’, in Kritzman, Lawrence D. (ed.), Michel Foucault: Politics, Philosophy, Culture. Interviews and Other Writings, 1977–1984 (Routledge: London, 1988), p. 257.

118 The Constitution of India, art. 5, part II, http://indiacode.nic.in/coiweb/welcome.html, [accessed 8 June 2014].

119 Chatterjee, Partha, ‘History and the nationalisation of Hinduism’, Social Research, 59, 1, 1992, pp. 111149; Pandey, Gyanendra, ‘Can a Muslim be an Indian?’, Comparative Studies in Society and History, 41, 4, 1999, pp. 608629.

* Non-incriminating thanks is due to Patrick Eisenlohr, Martijn Oosterbaan, Roschanack Shaery, the two anonymous reviewers of Modern Asian Studies, and my former colleagues at the Department of Cultural Anthropology, Utrecht University. A special thanks to Sarbari Sinha for helping me edit this article.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed