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New arsenate minerals from the Arsenatnaya fumarole, Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. VIII. Arsenowagnerite, Mg2(AsO4)F

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2018

Igor V. Pekov
Affiliation:
Faculty of Geology, Moscow State University, Vorobievy Gory, 119991 Moscow, Russia
Natalia V. Zubkova
Affiliation:
Faculty of Geology, Moscow State University, Vorobievy Gory, 119991 Moscow, Russia
Atali A. Agakhanov
Affiliation:
Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt 18-2, 119071 Moscow, Russia
Vasiliy O. Yapaskurt
Affiliation:
Faculty of Geology, Moscow State University, Vorobievy Gory, 119991 Moscow, Russia
Nikita V. Chukanov
Affiliation:
Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142432 Chernogolovka, Moscow Oblast, Russia
Dmitry I. Belakovskiy
Affiliation:
Fersman Mineralogical Museum of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt 18-2, 119071 Moscow, Russia
Evgeny G. Sidorov
Affiliation:
Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Piip Boulevard 9, 683006 Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russia
Dmitry Yu. Pushcharovsky
Affiliation:
Faculty of Geology, Moscow State University, Vorobievy Gory, 119991 Moscow, Russia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

A new mineral arsenowagnerite, Mg2(AsO4)F, the arsenate analogue of wagnerite, was found in sublimates of the Arsenatnaya fumarole at the Second scoria cone of the Northern Breakthrough of the Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption, Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. It is associated closely with johillerite, tilasite, anhydrite, hematite, fluorophlogopite, cassiterite, calciojohillerite, aphthitalite and fluoborite. Arsenowagnerite occurs as equant to tabular crystals up to 1 mm across combined in interrupted crusts up to 0.1 cm × 1.5 cm × 3 cm. The mineral is transparent, light yellow, lemon-yellow, greenish-yellow or colourless and has a vitreous lustre. Arsenowagnerite is brittle, with Mohs hardness of ~5. Cleavage is distinct, the fracture is uneven. Dcalc = 3.70 g cm–3. Arsenowagnerite is optically biaxial (+), α = 1.614(2), β = 1.615(2), γ = 1.640(2) and 2Vmeas = 25(5)°. Wavenumbers of the strongest absorption bands in the IR spectrum (cm–1) are: 874, 861, 507, 491 and 470. The chemical composition (average of six electron-microprobe analyses, wt.%) is: MgO 38.72, CaO 0.23, MnO 0.32, CuO 0.60, ZnO 0.05, Fe2O3 0.11, TiO2 0.03, SiO2 0.08, P2O5 0.18, V2O5 0.03, As2O5 54.96, SO3 0.10, F 8.91 and –O=F –3.75, total 100.57. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of 5 (O + F) apfu is: (Mg1.98Cu0.02Mn0.01Ca0.01)Σ2.02(As0.99P0.01)Σ1.00O4.03F0.97. Arsenowagnerite is monoclinic, P21/c, a = 9.8638(3), b = 12.9830(3), c = 12.3284(3) Å, β = 109.291(3)°, V = 1490.15(7) Å3 and Z = 16. The strongest reflections of the powder X-ray diffraction pattern [d,Å(I)(hkl)] are: 5.80(41)(002), 5.31(35)(120), 3.916(37)( $\bar 2$ 21), 3.339(98)(221, 023), 3.155(65)(202), 3.043(100)( $\bar 1$ 41), 2.940(72)( $\bar 2$ 04), 2.879(34)( $\bar 3$ 22) and 2.787(51)(320, $\bar 1$ 24). The crystal structure was solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, R = 0.0485. Arsenowagnerite is isostructural to wagnerite-Ma2bc. The crystal structure is built by almost regular AsO4 tetrahedra, distorted MgO4F2 octahedra and distorted MgO4F trigonal bipyramids.

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Copyright © Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2018 

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Stuart Mills

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New arsenate minerals from the Arsenatnaya fumarole, Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. VIII. Arsenowagnerite, Mg2(AsO4)F
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