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Crystallographic ordering of aluminium in laueite at Hagendorf-Süd

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018


I. E. Grey
Affiliation:
CSIRO Mineral Resources, Private Bag 10, Clayton South, Victoria 3169, Australia
E. Keck
Affiliation:
Algunderweg 3, 92694 Etzenricht, Germany
W. G. Mumme
Affiliation:
CSIRO Mineral Resources, Private Bag 10, Clayton South, Victoria 3169, Australia
C. M. MacRae
Affiliation:
CSIRO Mineral Resources, Private Bag 10, Clayton South, Victoria 3169, Australia
J. R. Price
Affiliation:
Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia
A. M. Glenn
Affiliation:
CSIRO Mineral Resources, Private Bag 10, Clayton South, Victoria 3169, Australia
C. J. Davidson
Affiliation:
CSIRO Mineral Resources, Private Bag 10, Clayton South, Victoria 3169, Australia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Crystals of laueite, Mn2+Fe2 3+(PO4)2(OH)2·8H2O, from the Cornelia mine open cut, Hagendorf Süd, Bavaria, are zoned due to aluminium incorporation at the iron sites, with analysed Al2O3 contents varying up to 11 wt.%. Synchrotron X-ray data were collected on two crystals with different Al contents and the structures refined. The laueite structure contains two independent Fe3+-containing sites; M2 and M3, which alternate in 7 Å corner-connected octahedral chains. The coordination polyhedra are different for the two sites, M2O4(OH)2 and M3O2(OH)2(H2O)2 respectively. The structure refinements show that Al preferentially orders into site M3. Refined site occupancies for M2 and M3 for the two crystals are: for crystal L-1, M2 = 0.70(1) Fe + 0.30(1) Al, M3 = 0.54(1) Fe + 0.46(1) Al and for crystal L-2, M2 = 0.67(1) Fe + 0.33(1) Al, M3 = 0.48(1) Fe + 0.52(1) Al. For crystal L-2, the octahedral chains have dominant Fe in M2, alternating with dominant Al in M3 along the chain, an ordering phenomenon not previously reported for laueite-related minerals.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2015

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