Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

X-ray studies of halloysite and metahalloysite

Part II. The transition of halloysite to metahalloysite in relation to relative humidity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 March 2018

G. W. Brindley
Affiliation:
Physics Laboratories, University of Leeds
J. Goodyear
Affiliation:
Physics Laboratories, University of Leeds

Extract

The experiments described below on the dehydration of halloysite were largely carried out in the laboratoire Central des Services Chimiques de l'État, Paris, where we enjoyed not only the excellent facilities of the laboratory but also the advice of Monsieur J. Méring and Mile R. Glaser who had made similar studies of montmorillonite. The use of a Guinier-type focusing camera with strictly monochromatic radiation was especially useful. These experiments were undertaken because little was known about the dehydration process beyond the recognition that it occurs very readily in dry atmospheres and at low temperatures. The main experimental difficulty lies in differentiating between water adsorbed oil external surfaces of the clay particles (adsorbed water) and water internally absorbed between the kaolin layers (interlayer water).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 1948

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Alexander, (L. T.), Faust, (G. T.), Hendricks, (S. B.), Insley, (H.), and McMurdie, (H. F.), 1943. Relationships of the clay minerals halloysite and endellite. Amer. Min., vol. 28, pp. 118. [M.A. 8–342.]Google Scholar
Bragg, (W. L.) and West, (J.), 1928. A technique for the X-ray examination of crystal structures with many parameters. Zeits. Krist., vol. 69, pp. 118148. [M.A. 4–17.]Google Scholar
Brindley, (G. W.), 1945. The effect of grain or particle size on X-ray reflections from mixed powders and alloys. Phil. Mag., vol. 36, pp. 347369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brindley, (G. W.) and Robinson, (K.), 1946. Randomness in the structures of kaolinitic clay minerals. Trans. Faraday Soc., vol. 42 B, pp. 198205.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brindley, (G. W.) and Spiers, (F. W.), 1934. A technique for the photographic determination of the intensities of X-ray reflections from powders. Proc. Physical Soc., vol. 46, pp. 841852.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brindley, (G. W.) and Spiers, (F. W.), 1938. The measurement in absolute units of the intensities of X-ray reflections from crystalline powders. Proc. Physical Soc., vol. 50, pp. 1729.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hendricks, (S. B.) and Jefferson, (M. E.), 1938. Structures of kaolin and talc-pyrophyllite hydrates and their bearing on water sorption of the clays. Amer. Min., vol. 23, pp. 863875. [M.A. 7422.]Google Scholar
Hendricks, (S. B.) and Teller, (E.), 1942. X-ray interference in partially ordered layer lattices. Journ. Chem. Physics, vol. 10, pp. 147167. [M.A. 9–221.]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hofmann, (U.), Endell, (K.), and Wilm, (D.), 1934. Röntgenographische und kolloidchemische Untersuchungen über Ton. Angew. Chem., vol. 47, pp. 539 547.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacEwan, (D. M. C.), 1947. The nomenclature of the halloysite minerals. Min. Mag., vol. 28, pp. 3644.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Méring, (J.), 1946. On the hydration of montmorillonite. Trans. Faraday Soc., vol. 42 B, pp. 205219.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ross, (C. S.), and Kerr, (P. F.), 1934. Halloysite and allophane. Prof. Paper, U.S. Geol. Survey, no. 185-G, pp. 135148. [M.A. 6–136.]Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 1 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 14th March 2018 - 19th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-76cb886bbf-2rmft Total loading time: 0.962 Render date: 2021-01-19T23:03:23.017Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

X-ray studies of halloysite and metahalloysite
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

X-ray studies of halloysite and metahalloysite
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

X-ray studies of halloysite and metahalloysite
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *