Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Structural Studies of Coronavirus Fusion Proteins

  • Alexandra C. Walls (a1), M. Alejandra Tortorici (a1) (a2), Xiaoli Xiong (a1), Joost Snijder (a1), Brandon Frenz (a1), Berend-Jan Bosch (a3), Frank DiMaio (a1), Davide Corti (a4), Félix A. Rey (a2) and David Veesler (a1)...
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Structural Studies of Coronavirus Fusion Proteins
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Structural Studies of Coronavirus Fusion Proteins
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Structural Studies of Coronavirus Fusion Proteins
      Available formats
      ×

Abstract

  • An abstract is not available for this content so a preview has been provided below. To view the full text please use the links above to select your preferred format.

Copyright

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: dveesler@uw.edu

References

Hide All
[1]Su, S, et al. (2016) Epidemiology, Genetic Recombination, and Pathogenesis of Coronaviruses. Trends Microbiol 24(6):490-502.
[2]Bosch, BJ, van der Zee, R, de Haan, CA, & Rottier, PJ (2003) The coronavirus spike protein is a class I virus fusion protein: structural and functional characterization of the fusion core complex. Journal of virology 77(16):8801-8811.
[3]Walls, AC, et al. (2016) Cryo-electron microscopy structure of a coronavirus spike glycoprotein trimer. Nature 531(7592):114-117.
[4]Walls, AC, et al. (2017) Tectonic conformational changes of a coronavirus spike glycoprotein promote membrane fusion. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114(42):11157-11162.
[5]Walls, AC, et al. (2016) Glycan shield and epitope masking of a coronavirus spike protein observed by cryo-electron microscopy. Nature structural & molecular biology 23(10):899-905.
[6]Walls, AC, et al. (2019) Unexpected Receptor Functional Mimicry Elucidates Activation of Coronavirus Fusion. Cell 176(5):1026-1039 e1015.
[7]Xiong, X, et al. (2017) Glycan shield and fusion activation of a deltacoronavirus spike glycoprotein fine-tuned for enteric infections. Journal of virology.

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed