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Adaptive Phenotypic Plasticity of Siberian Elm in Response to Drought Stress: Increased Stomatal Pore Depth

  • Go Eun Park (a1), Ki Woo Kim (a2), Don Koo Lee (a1) and Jung Oh Hyun (a3)

Abstract

Leaf stomatal characteristics of Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila) were investigated by electron microscopy and white light scanning interferometry. On the basis of average annual precipitations, two types of tree specimens were collected from Korea, China, and Mongolia: (1) trees under normal environmental conditions and (2) trees under arid conditions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed oval-shaped stomata on the lower surface, and they were ca. 20 μm in width. In-lens secondary electron imaging showed differences in electron density and stomatal pore depth between the two types. According to the line profile analysis by white light scanning interferometry, stomata under arid conditions appeared to have higher levels of the stomatal pore depth than ones under normal conditions. Focused ion beam–field emission electron microscopy supported the increased stomatal pore depth with the increasing drought stress gradient. These results suggest that complementary microscopy can be employed to unravel the adaptive phenotypic plasticity of Siberian elm in response to drought stress.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Corresponding author. E-mail: kiwoo@knu.ac.kr
Corresponding author. E-mail: leedk@snu.ac.kr
§Corresponding author. E-mail: junghyun@snu.ac.kr

References

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