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Quantitative Transmission Electron Microtomography of Complex Bicontinuous Polymer Nanostructures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 July 2020

R.J. Spontak
Affiliation:
Departments of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC27695
H. Jinnai
Affiliation:
Department of Polymer Science & Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto, Japan
M.B. Braunfeld
Affiliation:
Departments of Biochemistry & Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, CA94143
D.A. Agard
Affiliation:
Departments of Biochemistry & Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, CA94143

Extract

Nanostructured polymers constitute an increasingly important class of materials. Investigations into the formation of nanostructural elements in microphase-ordered block copolymers have elucidated universal mechanisms of self-organization in soft-condensed matter, since topologically comparable nanostructures develop in biological and surfactant systems. Emerging applications of such polymers include nanotemplates for inorganic materials, optical switches and nanoreactors. Despite all the efforts that have focused on these materials in previous years, basic questions regarding the characteristics of these nanostructures, especially those exhibiting bicontinuity, persist. While most attempts to address these questions have relied on small-angle scattering, a real-space approach to this problem compares slices of simulated nanostructures to 2-D transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. An alternate strategy is transmission electron microtomography (TEMT), which utilizes 3-D images (reconstructed from a series of 2-D images collected at sequential tilt angles) for detailed structural analysis. Using this method, we have, for instance, recently confirmed that packing frustration,

Type
Advances in Polymer Characterization
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America

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References

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