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Microstructural Characterization of Dehydrogenated Products of the LiBH4-YH3 Composite

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 October 2014

Ji Woo Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136–791, Republic of Korea
Kee-Bum Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136–791, Republic of Korea
Jae-Hyeok Shim*
Affiliation:
High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136–791, Republic of Korea
Young Whan Cho
Affiliation:
High Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136–791, Republic of Korea
Kyu Hwan Oh
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151–742, Republic of Korea
*
*Corresponding author. jhshim@kist.re.kr
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Abstract

The dehydrogenated microstructure of the lithium borohydride-yttrium hydride (LiBH4-YH3) composite obtained at 350°C under 0.3 MPa of hydrogen and static vacuum was investigated by transmission electron microscopy combined with a focused ion beam technique. The dehydrogenation reaction between LiBH4 and YH3 into LiH and YB4 takes place under 0.3 MPa of hydrogen, which produces YB4 nano-crystallites that are uniformly distributed in the LiH matrix. This microstructural feature seems to be beneficial for rehydrogenation of the dehydrogenation products. On the other hand, the dehydrogenation process is incomplete under static vacuum, leading to the unreacted microstructure, where YH3 and YH2 crystallites are embedded in LiBH4 matrix. High resolution imaging confirmed the presence of crystalline B resulting from the self-decomposition of LiBH4. However, Li2B12H12, which is assumed to be present in the LiBH4 matrix, was not clearly observed.

Type
Materials Applications
Copyright
© Microscopy Society of America 2014 

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Footnotes

Present address: Battery R&D, LG Chem Research Park, Daejeon 305-738, Republic of Korea.

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