Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Matrix-Mediated Biomineralization in Marine Mollusks: A Combined Transmission Electron Microscopy and Focused Ion Beam Approach

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 March 2011

Martin Saunders
Affiliation:
Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
Charlie Kong
Affiliation:
Electron Microscopy Unit, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
Jeremy A. Shaw
Affiliation:
Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
Peta L. Clode
Affiliation:
Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation and Analysis, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Perth, WA 6009, Australia
Corresponding

Abstract

The teeth of the marine mollusk Acanthopleura hirtosa are an excellent example of a complex, organic, matrix-mediated biomineral, with the fully mineralized teeth comprising layers of iron oxide and iron oxyhydroxide minerals around a calcium apatite core. To investigate the relationship between the various mineral layers and the organic matrix fibers on which they grew, sections have been prepared from specific features in the teeth at controlled orientations using focused ion beam processing. Compositional and microstructural details of heterophase interfaces, and the fate of the organic matrix fibers within the mineral layers, can then be analyzed by a range of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Energy-filtered TEM highlights the interlocking nature of the various mineral phases, while high-angle annular dark-field scanning TEM imaging demonstrates that the organic matrix continues to exist in the fully mineralized teeth. These new insights into the structure of this complex biomaterial are an important step in understanding the relationship between its structural and physical properties and may help explain its high strength and crack-resistance behavior.

Type
Biological Applications
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Addadi, L., Joester, D., Nudelman, F. & Weiner, S. (2006). Mollusk shell formation: A source of new concepts for understanding biomineralization processes. Chem Europ J 12, 980987.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Birchall, J.D. (1989). The importance of the study of biominerals to materials technology. In Biomineralization: Chemical and Biochemical Perspectives, Mann, S., Webb, J. & Williams, R.J.P. (Eds.), pp. 491509. Weinheim, Germany: VCH Verlagsgesellschaft.Google Scholar
Evans, L.A., Macey, D.J. & Webb, J. (1990). Characterization and structural organization of the organic matrix of the radula teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura hirtosa. Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 329, 8796.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evans, L.A., Macey, D.J. & Webb, J. (1994). Matrix heterogeneity in the radular teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura hirtosa. Acta Zool 75(1), 7579.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fratzl, P. (2007). Biomimetic materials research: What can we really learn from nature's structural materials? J R Soc Interface 4, 637642.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Huebsch, N. & Mooney, D.J. (2009). Inspiration and application in the evolution of biomaterials. Nature 462(7272), 426432.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kim, K.S., Macey, D.J., Webb, J. & Mann, S. (1989). Iron mineralization in the radula teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura hirtosa. Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci B237, 335346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, A.P., Webb, J., Macey, D.J., van Bronswijk, W., Savarese, A. & De Witt, C. (1998). In situ Raman spectroscopic studies of the teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura hirtosa. J Biol Inorg Chem 3, 614619.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lowenstam, H.A. (1967). Lepidocroref, an apatite mineral, and magnetite in teeth of chitons (Polyplacophora). Science 156(3780), 13731375.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lowenstam, H.A. & Weiner, S. (1989). On Biomineralization. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Macey, D.J., Webb, J. & Brooker, L.R. (1994). The structure and synthesis of biominerals in chiton teeth. Bull Inst Oceanog 14(1), 191197.Google Scholar
Mann, S. (2001). Biomineralization, Principals and Concepts in Bioinorganic Materials Chemistry. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Mann, S. & Ozin, G.A. (1996). Synthesis of inorganic materials with complex form. Nature 382, 313318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nesson, M.H. & Lowenstam, H.A. (1985). Biomineralization processes of the radula teeth of chitons. In Magnetite Biomineralization and Magnetoreception in Organisms, Kirshvink, J.L., Jones, D.S. & MacFadden, B.J. (Eds.), pp. 333361. New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Saunders, M., Kong, C., Shaw, J.A., Macey, D.J. & Clode, P.L. (2009). Characterization of biominerals in the radula teeth of the chiton, Acanthopleura hirtosa. J Struct Biol 167(1), 5561.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Saunders, M., Shaw, J.A., Clode, P.L., Kong, C. & Macey, D.J. (2010). Fine-scale analysis of biomineralized mollusc teeth using FIB and TEM. Microsc Today 18(1), 2428.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shaw, J.A., Macey, D.J. & Brooker, L.R. (2008). Radula synthesis by three species of iron mineralizing molluscs: Production rate and elemental demand. J Mar Biol Assoc UK 88(3), 597601.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shaw, J.A., Macey, D.J., Brooker, L.R. & Clode, P.L. (2010). Tooth use and wear in three iron-biomineralizing mollusc species. Biol Bull 218, 132144.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shaw, J.A., Macey, D.J., Brooker, L.R., Stockdale, E.J., Saunders, M. & Clode, P.L. (2009a). The chiton stylus canal: An element delivery pathway for tooth cusp biomineralization. J Morphol 270(5), 588600.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shaw, J.A., Macey, D.J., Brooker, L.R., Stockdale, E.J., Saunders, M. & Clode, P.L. (2009b). Ultrastructure of the epithelial cells associated with tooth biomineralization in the chiton Acanthopleura hirtosa. Microsc Microanal 15(2), 154165.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sone, E.D., Weiner, S. & Addadi, L. (2007). Biomineralization of limpet teeth: A cryo-TEM study of the organic matrix and the onset of mineral deposition. J Struct Biol 158, 428444.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
van der Wal, P., Giesen, H. & Videler, J. (2000). Radular teeth as models for the improvement of industrial cutting devices. Mater Sci Eng C 7(2), 129142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
van der Wal, P., Videler, J.J., Havinga, P. & Pel, R. (1989). Architecture and chemical composition of the magnetite-bearing layer in the radula teeth of Chiton olivaceus (Polyplacophora). In Origin, Evolution, and Modern Aspects of Biomineralization in Plants and Animals, Crick, R.E. (Ed.), pp. 153166. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
Wealthall, R.J., Brooker, L.R., Macey, D.J. & Griffin, B.J. (2005). Fine structure of the mineralized teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata (Mollusca: Polyplacophora). J Morphol 265(2), 165175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weaver, J.C., Wang, Q., Miserez, A., Tantuccio, A., Stromberg, R., Bozhilov, K.N., Maxwell, P., Nay, R., Heier, S.T., DiMasi, E. & Kisailus, D. (2010). Analysis of an ultra hard magnetic biomineral in chiton radular teeth. Mater Today 13(1-2), 4252.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weiner, S. (2008). Biomineralization: A structural perspective. J Struct Biol 163(3), 229234.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Weiner, S. & Addadi, L. (2002). At the cutting edge. Science 298(5592), 375376.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Weiner, S., Sagi, I. & Addadi, L. (2005). Choosing the crystallization path less traveled. Science 309, 10271028.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 8
Total number of PDF views: 38 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 16th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-77fc7d77f9-fgqm6 Total loading time: 0.265 Render date: 2021-01-16T03:59:02.311Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Sat Jan 16 2021 03:53:12 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": true, "languageSwitch": true, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Matrix-Mediated Biomineralization in Marine Mollusks: A Combined Transmission Electron Microscopy and Focused Ion Beam Approach
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Matrix-Mediated Biomineralization in Marine Mollusks: A Combined Transmission Electron Microscopy and Focused Ion Beam Approach
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Matrix-Mediated Biomineralization in Marine Mollusks: A Combined Transmission Electron Microscopy and Focused Ion Beam Approach
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *