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In Situ Observation of the Early Stages of Rapid Solid–Liquid Reaction in Closed Liquid Cell TEM Using Graphene Encapsulation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 December 2021

Hyun Woo Cha
Affiliation:
School of Advanced Materials Science & Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do16419, Korea
Byeong-Seon An
Affiliation:
School of Advanced Materials Science & Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do16419, Korea
Cheol-Woong Yang*
Affiliation:
School of Advanced Materials Science & Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do16419, Korea
*
*Corresponding author: Cheol-Woong Yang, E-mail: cwyang@skku.edu

Abstract

In situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a very useful tool for investigating dynamic solid–liquid reactions. However, there are challenges to observe the early stages of spontaneous solid–liquid reactions using a closed-type liquid cell system, the most popular and simple liquid cell system. We propose a graphene encapsulation method to overcome this limitation of closed-type liquid cell TEM. The solid and liquid are separated using graphene to suspend the reaction until the graphene layer is destroyed. Graphene can be decomposed by the high-energy electron beam used in TEM, allowing the reaction to proceed. Fast dissolution of graphene-capped copper nanoparticles in an FeCl3 solution was demonstrated via in situ liquid cell TEM at 300 kV using a cell with closed-type SiNx windows.

Type
Materials Science Applications
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Microscopy Society of America

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In Situ Observation of the Early Stages of Rapid Solid–Liquid Reaction in Closed Liquid Cell TEM Using Graphene Encapsulation
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