Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

On the expressiveness of π-calculus for encoding mobile ambients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2016

LINDA BRODO
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Scienze Politiche, Scienze della Comunicazione e Ingegneria, dell'Informazione, Università degli Studi di Sassari, viale Mancini, 5 - 07100 - Sassari, Italia Email: brodo@uniss.it
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

We investigate the expressiveness of two classical distributed paradigms by defining the first encoding of the pure mobile ambient calculus into the synchronous π-calculus. Our encoding, whose correctness has been proved by relying on the notion of operational correspondence, shows how the hierarchical ambient structure can be reformulated within a flat channel interconnection amongst independent processes, without centralised control. To easily handle the computation for simulating a capability, we introduce the notions of simulating trace (representing the computation that a π-calculus process has to execute to mimic a capability) and of aborting trace (representing the computation that a π-calculus process executes when the simulation of a capability cannot succeed). Thus, the encoding may introduce loops, but, as it will be shown, the number of steps of any trace, therefore of any aborting trace, is limited, and the number of states of the transition system of the encoding processes still remains finite. In particular, an aborting trace makes a sort of backtracking, leaving the involved sub-processes in the same starting configurations. We also discuss two run-time support methods to make these loops harmless at execution time. Our work defines a relatively simple, direct, and precise translation that reproduces the ambient structure by means of channel links, and keeps track of the dissolving of an ambient.

Type
Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

References

Bodei, C., Brodo, L. and Bruni, R. (2013). Open multiparty interaction. In: Martí-Oliet, N. and Palomino, M. (eds.) Recent Trends in Algebraic Development Techniques, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, volume 7841, Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, 123.Google Scholar
Bodei, C., Brodo, L., Bruni, R. and Chiarugi, C. (2014). A flat process calculus for nested membrane interactions. Scientific Annals of Computer Science 24 (1) 91136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brodo, L. (2011). On the expressiveness of the π-calculus and the mobile ambients. In: Johnson, M. and Pavlovic, D. (eds.) AMAST-Algebraic Methodology and Software Technology, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, volume 6486, Springer-Verlag, 4459.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brodo, L., Degano, P. and Priami, C. (2003). Reflecting mobile ambients into the π-calculus. In: Priami, C. (ed.) Global Computing. Programming Environments, Languages, Security, and Analysis of Systems, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, volume 2874, Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, 2556.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Busi, N., Gabbrielli, M. and Zavattaro, G. (2009). On the expressive power of recursion, replication and iteration in process calculi. Mathematical Structures in Computer Science 19 (6) 11911222.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cardelli, L. (2005). Brane calculi - interactions of biological membranes. In: Danos, V. and Schachter, V. (eds.) Computational Methods in Systems Biology, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, volume 3082, Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, 257278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cardelli, L. and Gordon, A. (2000). Mobile ambients. Theoretical Computer Science 240 (1) 177213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cenciarelli, P., Talamo, I. and Tiberi, A. (2005). Ambient graph rewriting. Electronic Notes in Theoretical Computer Science, volume 117, Elsevier, 335351.Google Scholar
Ciobanu, G. and Zakharov, V.A. (2007). Encoding mobile ambients into the π-calculus. In: Virbitskaite, I. and Voronkov, A. (eds.) Perspectives of Systems Informatics, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, volume 4378, Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, 148165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fournet, C., Lévy, J.-J. and Schmitt, A. (2000). An asynchronous, distributed implementation of mobile ambients. In: Leeuwen, J., Watanabe, O., Hagiya, M., Mosses, P.D. and Ito, T. (eds.) Theoretical Computer Science: Exploring New Frontiers of Theoretical Informatics, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, volume 1872, Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, 348364.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gadducci, F. and Monreale, G.V. (2010). A decentralized implementation of mobile ambients. The Journal of Logic and Algebraic Programming 80 (2) 113136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gorla, D. (2010). A taxonomy of process calculi for distribution and mobility. Distributed Computing 23 (4) 273299.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Levi, F. and Sangiorgi, D. (2003). Mobile safe ambients. ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems (TOPLAS) 25 (1) 169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Milner, R., Parrow, J. and Walker, D. (1992). A calculus of mobile processes, part 1–2. Information and Computation 100 (1) 177.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Palamidessi, C. (2003). Comparing the expressive power of the synchronous and the asynchronous pi-calculus. Mathematical Structures in Computer Science 15 (5) 685719.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parrow, J. (2001). An introduction to the π-calculus. In: Handbook of Process Algebra, Elsevier Science, 479543.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pǎun, Gh. (2000). Computing with membranes. Computer and System Sciences 61 (1) 108143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Phillips, I. and Vigliotti, M.G. (2008). Symmetric electoral systems for ambient calculi. Information and Computation 206 (1) 3472.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sangiorgi, D. (1996). Pi-calculus, internal mobility, and agent-passing calculi. Theoretical Computer Science 167 (1&2) 235274.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zimmer, P. (2003). On the expressiveness of the pure safe ambients. Mathematical Structures in Computer Science 13 (5) 721770.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 118 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 22nd September 2016 - 17th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access
Hostname: page-component-77fc7d77f9-mhpm4 Total loading time: 0.266 Render date: 2021-01-17T22:32:17.962Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "1", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Sun Jan 17 2021 22:03:29 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": true, "languageSwitch": true, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

On the expressiveness of π-calculus for encoding mobile ambients
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

On the expressiveness of π-calculus for encoding mobile ambients
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

On the expressiveness of π-calculus for encoding mobile ambients
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *