Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Relativistic cavity, possibilities, and advantages

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 October 2020

Saeed Mirzanejhad
Affiliation:
Department of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar, Iran
Farshad Sohbatzadeh
Affiliation:
Department of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar, Iran
Fatemeh Shams
Affiliation:
Department of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar, Iran
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The relativistic mirror (RM) is an interesting subject which introduced in the nonlinear regime of the laser–plasma interaction. Reflection of counter-propagating probe pulse from relativistic flying mirror has some excellent features, such as frequency up-shifting and compressing by a factor of 4γ2. In the high-intensity laser–plasma interaction, sometimes a sequence of RMs creates. For example, electron density cusps generate in the nonlinear laser wakefield generation or flying electron sheaths create in the blown-out regime of the laser foil interaction. Under these circumstances, the second counter-propagated seed (probe) pulse can be reflected back and forth between two or more successive RMs. This structure may be used as a relativistic cavity (RECA). Amplification and threshold conditions for the gain medium and pumping rate in the RECA are obtained, and it is shown that amplification can be started from background simultaneous emission (without seed pulse). A new feature of RECA is it's bidirectional (two frequencies) characteristic. Thereupon, the gain process can be implemented on the two different transitions in this bidirectional gain structure. In the RECA, driver pulse may be assembled as a pumping operation, and background plasma medium with high degree ionized substances is a good candidate for gain medium in the UV or X-ray regions. In this paper, we propose a new all-optical cavity for the generation of the ultrashort laser pulse in the UV or X-ray regions.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Bulanov, SV, Esirkepov, TV, Kando, M, Pirozhkov, AS and Rosanov, NN (2013) Relativistic mirrors in plasmas. Novel results and perspectives. Physics-Uspekhi 56, 429.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chung, S-Y, Lee, HJ, Lee, K and Kim, DE (2011) Generation of a few femtosecond keV X-ray pulse via interaction of a tightly focused laser copropagating with a relativistic electron bunch. Physical Review Accelerators and Beams 14, 060705.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corde, S, Phuoc, KT, Lambert, G, Fitour, R, Malka, V, Rousse, A, Beck, A and Lefebvre, E (2013) Femtosecond X rays from laser-plasma accelerators. Reviews of Modern Physics 85, 1.10.1103/RevModPhys.85.1CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Esirkepov, TZ, Bulanov, SV, Kando, M, Pirozhkov, AS and Zhidkov, AG (2009 a) Boosted high-harmonics pulse from a double-sided relativistic mirror. Physical Review Letters 103, 025002.10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.025002CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Esirkepov, TZ, Bulanov, SV, Zhidkov, AG, Pirozhkov, AS and Kando, M (2009 b) High-power laser-driven source of ultra-short X-ray and γ-ray pulses. European Physical Journal D 55, 457.10.1140/epjd/e2009-00172-yCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Habs, D, Hegelich, M, Schreiber, J, Gross, M, Henig, A, Kiefer, D and Jung, D (2008) Dense laser-driven electron sheets as relativistic mirrors for coherent production of brilliant X-ray and γ-ray beams. Applied Physics B 93, 349.10.1007/s00340-008-3239-4CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hudson, LT and Seely, JF (2010) Laser-produced X-ray sources. Radiation Physics and Chemistry 79, 132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jain, V, Maheshwari, KP, Jaiman, NK and Malav, H (2014) Non-linear interaction of ultra-intense ultra-short laser pulse with a relativistic flying double-sided dense plasma slab/mirror. Laser and Particle Beams 32, 253.10.1017/S0263034614000068CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kiefer, D, Yeung, M, Dzelzainis, T, Foster, PS, Rykovanov, SG, Lewis, CLS, Marjoribanks, RS, Ruhl, H, Habs, D, Schreiber, J, Zepf, M and Dromey, B (2013) Relativistic electron mirrors from nanoscale foils for coherent frequency upshift to the extreme ultraviolet. Nature Communications 4, 1763.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kulagin, VV, Cherepenin, VA, Gulyaev, YV, Kornienko, VN, Pae, KH, Valuev, VV, Lee, J and Suk, K (2009) Characteristics of relativistic electron mirrors generated by an ultrashort nonadiabatic laser pulse from a nanofilm. Physical Review E 80, 016404.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kulagin, VV, Kornienko, VN, Cherepenin, VA and Suk, H (2013) Generation of intense coherent attosecond X-ray pulses using relativistic electron mirrors. Quantum Electronics 43, 443.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Milonni, PW and Eberly, JH (2010) Laser Physics. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.10.1002/9780470409718CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Panchenko, AV, Esirkepov, TZ, Pirozhkov, PS, Kando, M, Kamenets, FF and Bulanov, SV (2008) Interaction of electromagnetic waves with caustics in plasma flows. Physical Review E 78, 056402.10.1103/PhysRevE.78.056402CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pirozhkov, AS, Kando, M, Esirkepov, TZ, Gallegos, P, Ahmed, H, Ragozin, EN, Faenov, AYa, Pikuz, TA, Kawachi, T, Sagisaka, A, Koga, JK, Coury, M, Green, J, Foster, P, Brenner, C, Dromey, B, Symes, DR, Mori, M, Kawase, K, Kameshima, T, Fukuda, Y, Chen, L, Daito, I, Ogura, K, Hayashi, Y, Kotaki, H, Kiriyama, H, Okada, H, Nishimori, N, Imazono, T, Kondo, K, Kimura, T, Tajima, T, Daido, H, Rajeev, P, McKenna, P, Borghesi, M, Neely, D, Kato, Y and Bulanov, SV (2012) Soft X-ray harmonic comb from relativistic electron spikes. Physical Review Letters 108, 135004.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 5
Total number of PDF views: 13 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 15th October 2020 - 28th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-6585876b8c-6qrbf Total loading time: 0.273 Render date: 2021-01-28T11:55:03.415Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Relativistic cavity, possibilities, and advantages
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Relativistic cavity, possibilities, and advantages
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Relativistic cavity, possibilities, and advantages
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *