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        Jeremy King & Sandro Sessarego (eds.), Language variation and contact-induced change: Spanish across space and time. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2018. Pp. vi, 336. Hb. €99.
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        Jeremy King & Sandro Sessarego (eds.), Language variation and contact-induced change: Spanish across space and time. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2018. Pp. vi, 336. Hb. €99.
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        Jeremy King & Sandro Sessarego (eds.), Language variation and contact-induced change: Spanish across space and time. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2018. Pp. vi, 336. Hb. €99.
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King & Sessarego's edited volume should be applauded for featuring a wealth of diversity within Spanish contact varieties. Geographic regions from all four hemispheres are included, as are speakers of differing racial, religious, ethnic, and gender backgrounds. Ch. 2, covering Afro-Costa Rican women's language choice, and ch. 5, which looks at Mayan speakers, were both stellar examples of bringing attention to less commonly served communities. It should also be noted that a multitude of methodologies and theoretical frameworks have been implemented by the different authors, adding to the richness of this compilation.

Part 1 exemplifies this diversity of both speech communities and research approaches in focusing on the role of migration on contact-induced change. For example, Andrew Lynch's postmodernist framework to multilingualism and language shift in globalized societies contrasts with Lisbeth A. Philip's domain-based analysis of language maintenance and shift within Black West Indian immigrants in Costa Rica. The third chapter, Rey Romero & Sandro Sessarego's comparison of Istanbulite Judeo-Spanish and Afro-Ecuadorian Spanish, is particularly compelling as the authors describe two very different language ecologies (different language typologies in contact with Spanish in different geographic regions) whose resulting contact varieties share certain grammatical features.

Part 2 concerns internal and external factors in pragmatic variation. The chapters within this section cover variation at the syntax/pragmatics interface, including discourse markers and speech acts, both of which tend to be underanalyzed within contact linguistics. One standout is Ch. 5 where Mary Jill Brody uses natural corpus data in comparing borrowed Spanish discourse markers across three generations of speakers of Tojol-ab'al (a Mayan language). Brody makes contributions to contact linguistics and sociolinguistics more broadly, as she considers structural features as well as social factors including age and language attitudes in speakers’ choice of discourse markers. While the next section examines linguistic structure more typically studied within contact linguistics (morphosyntactic variation), the authors of these chapters incorporate much needed sociolinguistic perspectives on the Spanish-contact communities in question without sacrificing contact linguistic theory. For example, Héctor Ramírez-Cruz's chapter on third-person pronominal objects within Amazonian Columbian Spanish considers social variables such as speaker gender, age, and occupation, while also incorporating competition model of language evolution as part of his fieldwork's theoretical framework.

The last two chapters of the volume make up the final section dedicated to bilingual variation. These chapters complement one another as Kendall Kyzar focuses on Spanish-English bilingual Mexicans residing in Louisiana, whereas Terri Schroth & Bryant Smith focus on US student learners of Spanish. The latter in particular provides important perspectives on the role of motivation in language learning and in the treatment of second language acquisition as a language contact situation (and vice versa).

Each chapter offers unique insights with distinct methodological approaches and communities of study. The diversity in language ecologies and research subjects is not only useful in examining theoretical concepts of language contact, but also in understanding the interaction among globalization, migration, and language. As a whole, the book could be used for great case studies in a classroom setting, in addition to serving as an exemplary reference for other researchers.