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Linguistic stance: An integrative paradigm for mixed methods social science

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 October 2019

Robert W. Schrauf*
Affiliation:
Pennsylvania State University, USA
Patria López De Victoria
Affiliation:
University of Puerto Rico at Cayey, Puerto Rico
Brett Diaz
Affiliation:
Pennsylvania State University, USA
*
Address for correspondence: Robert W. Schrauf, Department of Applied Linguistics, 240 Sparks Building, Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity Park, PA16802, USArws23@psu.edu

Abstract

This article develops an integrative mixed methods framework grounded in stancetaking as the originary act through which qualitative interview and quantitative survey data are generated. The article examines how the basics of ‘everyday’ social stance—evaluation, positioning, and alignment within a sociocultural field—are strategically manipulated by social scientists in the twinned conditions of the interview and the survey. Relative to interview data, we demonstrate how participants link their stancetaking to wider sociocultural frames via the discursive devices of indexicality, accounting practices, and appeal to norms. Relative to survey data, we show how participants construct a ‘public’ via their engagement in the survey task, and how their stancetaking on survey items is virtually equivalent to ‘votes’ that are later aggregated to create second-order group-level stances. Mixed methods researchers then transform both qualitative and quantitative first-order stances into second-order stances that serve to describe and model social life. (Mixed methods, discourse devices, indexicality, normativity, interview, survey)

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019

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