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Dialects and the teaching of a standard language: Some West German work*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 December 2008

Stephen Barbour
Affiliation:
Department of Linguistic & International Studies, University of Surrey

Abstract

In applied sociolinguistics in West Germany the notion has been influential that the indigenous working class is separated from the middle class by a linguistic barrier and thus is at a linguistic disadvantage, as well as suffering other forms of disadvantage. The paper places this view in its context within German work on language and society, examines it critically, and outlines why, in the author's view, it is of questionable validity. (Sociolinguistics, dialectology, education, German)

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1987

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