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Effects of heat and fire on the germination of Acacia sieberiana D.C. and Acacia gerrardii Benth. in Uganda

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 July 2009

Patrick Mucunguzi
Affiliation:
Department of Botany, Makerere University, P. O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda
Hannington Oryem-Origa
Affiliation:
Department of Botany, Makerere University, P. O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda

Abstract

The effects of heat treatment and fire on seed germination of Acacia sieberiana D.C. and Acacia gerrardii Benth. were studied. Dry heat and fire were studied separately. Seeds treated with dry heat were set to germinate in petri-dishes under laboratory conditions. Other seeds were planted in plots at the Uganda Institute of Ecology, Mweya, which were then burnt, and subsequent seedling emergence was monitored. The effect of heat treatment on seed germination depended on heat intensity and duration of exposure. Higher intensities reduced the germination capacity of Acacia seeds. Short exposure of seeds stimulated germination but prolonged exposure rapidly reduced seed viability. A. sieberiana had a higher heat resistance than A. gerrardii. The survival and germination of seeds after fire increased with depth of burial and A. sieberiana survived better than A. gerrardii. The germinability of seeds of A. gerrardii was not significantly increased by fire.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1996

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Effects of heat and fire on the germination of Acacia sieberiana D.C. and Acacia gerrardii Benth. in Uganda
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