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Studies on the Factors Affecting the Release of Organic Matter By Skeletonema Costatum (Greville) Cleve in Culture

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2009

L. Ignatiades
Affiliation:
Department of Botany, Westfield College, London, N.W.3
G. E. Fogg
Affiliation:
Department of Botany, Westfield College, London, N.W.3

Extract

A few studies on the excretion of organic matter by marine phytoplankton in culture have been reported (Guillard & Wangersky, 1958; Wangersky & Guillard, 1960; Stewart, 1963; Hellebust, 1965). Eppley & Sloan (1965) reported extensive excretion in Skeletonema costatum (Greville) Cleve cultures as they approached senescence and emphasized that excretion is inversely proportional to the physiological activity of cells. Hellebust (1965) demonstrated the release of high amounts (up to 38% of the carbon assimilated) of organic matter by Sk. costatum cells exposed to low light intensities. It is apparent that more knowledge is needed in order to define the intra- and extracellular factors affecting the excretion.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 1973

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