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Mother–young cohabitation in Phronimella elongata and Phronima spp. (Amphipoda, Hyperiidea, Phronimidae)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 April 2013

Masakazu N. Aoki
Affiliation:
Shimoda Marine Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Shimoda, Shizuoka 415-0025, Japan
Chie Matsumoto-Ohshima
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Biology, and Marine Science, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan
Euichi Hirose
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Biology, and Marine Science, Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213, Japan
Jun Nishikawa
Affiliation:
Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa 277-8564, Japan
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Reproductive characteristics of poorly studied hyperiid amphipods, especially Phronimella elongata, are described. Among nine species of hand-collected phronimids, females of Phronimella elongata, Phronima dunbari and Phronima sedentaria cohabited with their young in a ‘barrel' derived from gelatinous zooplankton. Five growth stages of young were identified in Phronimella elongata: young of stages I–IV were found with the mother in the barrel, but stage-V young clinged to the mother retaining no barrel. The cohabiting young in Phronimella elongata and Phronima sedentaria always consisted of single growth stage. In a single female of Phronima dunbari, however, two different stages of young coexisted in a barrel. In Phronimella elongata, the mother size significantly correlated with the number of brooded eggs or cohabiting young regardless of growth stages of young. Considerable variation in the number of eggs or young per female among phronimid species may attribute to the differences in the volumes of the brood pouches.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2013 

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References

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Mother–young cohabitation in Phronimella elongata and Phronima spp. (Amphipoda, Hyperiidea, Phronimidae)
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