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Length-weight relationship, growth and mortality of Anadara granosa in Penang Island, Malaysia: an approach using length-frequency data sets

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 October 2014

Mohammad Reza Mirzaei
Affiliation:
Marine Sciences Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang, Malaysia
Zulfigar Yasin
Affiliation:
Marine Sciences Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang, Malaysia
Aileen Tan Shau Hwai
Affiliation:
Marine Sciences Laboratory, School of Biological Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang, Malaysia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Length-weight relationship, growth parameters and mortality rates of Anadara granosa in the intertidal zone of Balik Pulau, Penang Island, West Coast of Malaysia were investigated based on monthly length-frequency data (December 2011 to November 2012). A total of 548 individuals ranging from 11.25 to 33.13 mm size were subjected to analysis. Logarithmic relationship between the length and weight was Log W = 2.328 Log L − 2.537 (R2 = 0.922) for combined sexes. From this equation it was clear that the exponent ‘b’ value for A. granosa showed a negative allometric growth (b < 3). A von Bertalanffy growth function with an asymptotic length (L) of 35.40 mm and a growth constant (K) of 1.1 year−1 was established from length frequency distributions. The t0(−0.140) was estimated by substituting the Land K in the Pauly's equation. The sizes attained by A. granosa were 10.13, 14.36, 17.89, 20.82, 23.56 and 25.29 mm at the end of 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 months, respectively. The estimated growth performance index (Ø) was 3.13 while the estimated lifespan of the cockles was about 2.72 years at the study area. The estimated value of total mortality based on length-converted catch curve was Z = 3.02 year−1. The natural mortality (M) and fishing mortality (F) rates were 1.84 and 0.48 year−1, respectively. The exploitation level (E) of A. granosa was 0.20, which indicated slight fishing pressure on the stock.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2014 

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