Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-dxfhg Total loading time: 0.464 Render date: 2021-03-06T12:22:09.246Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Feeding, Growth, Reproduction and Nitrogen Utilization by the Harpacticoid Copepod, Tigriopus Brevicornis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 May 2009

R. P. Harris
Affiliation:
Marine Biological Laboratory, Citadel Hill, Plymouth PL1 2PB, England

Extract

Growth of the littoral harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus brevicornis O. F. Müller was measured in an intertidal rock pool. The generation time at the field temperature of 15°C was 31 days, and growth during this period resulted in an increase of 1.1829 μg body nitrogen.

Measurements of nitrogen excreted by developmental stages were made on animals removed from the natural population. Ammonia comprised on average 89.7% of the total nitrogen excreted by adults. Some measurements of phosphorus excretion indicated a nitrogen: phosphorus ratio in excretory products of 4.86. Adult females excreted 27.2 μg N/mg dry wt/day, representing a release of about 30% of body nitrogen daily. Excretory rates of earlier copepodite and naupliar stages were higher.

The efficiency with which ingested food was assimilated was measured for animals feeding on natural suspended matter obtained from the pool. Assimilation efficiencies averaged 75.4%.

Egg production was measured at a range of temperatures in the laboratory, enabling an estimate to be made of total production by an individual female. At 15°C females produced an average of ten egg sacs in 30 days.

Measurement of nitrogen lost during moulting suggested a value of 6% of total body nitrogen.

The data obtained have been used to estimate growth efficiency in terms of nitrogen during the entire life-history of a female in the pool. Gross growth efficiency calculated for the period of growth from egg to adult is 13.0% and the net efficiency 17.2%. Efficiencies of egg production by the adult female are higher, the gross efficiency being 22.1% and the net 29.3%. During the entire life-span 72.9% of assimilated nitrogen is expended in metabolism, 3.9% in growth, 0.4% as moults, and 26.6% in egg production.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 1973

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Anderson, J. W. & Stephens, G. C., 1969. Uptake of organic material by aquatic invertebrates. VI. Role of epiflora in apparent uptake of glycine by marine crustaceans. Marine Biology, 4, 243–9.Google Scholar
Armstrong, F. A. J. & Tibbitts, S., 1968. Photochemical combustion of organic matter in sea water for nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon determination. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 48, 143–52.Google Scholar
Bendschneider, K. & Robinson, R. J., 1952. A new spectrophotometric method for the determination of nitrite in sea water. Journal of Marine Research, 11, 8796.Google Scholar
Butler, E. I., Corner, E. D. S. & Marshall, S. M., 1969. On the nutrition and metabolism of zooplankton. VI. Feeding efficiency of Calanus in terms of nitrogen and phosphorus. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 49, 9771001.Google Scholar
Butler, E. I., Corner, E. D. S. & Marshall, S. M., 1970. On the nutrition and metabolism of zooplankton. VII. Seasonal survey of nitrogen and phosphorus excretion by Calanus in the Clyde Sea-area. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 50, 525–60.Google Scholar
Clutter, R. I. & Theilacker, G. H., 1971. Ecological efficiency of a pelagic mysid shrimp. Estimates from growth, energy budget, and mortality studies. Fishery Bulletin. Fish and Wild-life Service. United States Department of the Interior, 69, 93115.Google Scholar
Comita, G. W., 1964. The energy budget of Diaptomus siciliodes Lilljeborg. Internationale Vereinigung fiir theoretische und angewandte Limnologie, 15, 646–53.Google Scholar
Comita, G. W. & Comita, J. J., 1966. Egg production in Tigriopus brevicornis. In Some Contemporary Studies in Marine Science (ed. H., Barnes), pp. 171–85. London: Allen and Unwin.Google Scholar
Conover, R. J., 1964. Food relations and nutrition of zooplankton. Proceedings of Symposium on Experimental Marine Ecology. Occasional Publication no. 2, Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, pp. 8191.Google Scholar
Conover, R. J., 1966. Assimilation of organic matter by zooplankton. Limnology and Oceanography, 11,338–45.Google Scholar
Conover, R. J., 1968. Zooplankton - Life in a nutritionally dilute environment. American Zoolo-gist, 8, 107–18.Google Scholar
Corner, E. D. S., 1972. Laboratory studies related to zooplankton production in the sea. Symposia of the Zoological Society of London, 29, 185201.Google Scholar
Corner, E. D. S. & Cowey, C. B., 1968. Biochemical studies on the production of marine zooplankton. Biological Reviews, 43, 393426.Google Scholar
Corner, E. D. S., Cowey, C. B. & Marshall, S. M., 1965. On the nutrition and metabolism of zooplankton. III. Nitrogen excretion by Calanus. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 45, 429–42.Google Scholar
Corner, E. D. S., Cowey, C. B. & Marshall, S. M., 1967. On the nutrition and metabolism of zooplankton. V. Feeding efficiency of Calanus finmarchicus. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 47, 259–70.Google Scholar
Corner, E. D. S. & Newell, B. S., 1967. On the nutrition and metabolism of zooplankton. IV. The forms of nitrogen excreted by Calanus. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 47, 113–20.Google Scholar
Coull, B. C. & Vernberg, W. B., 1970. Harpacticoid copepod respiration:Enhydrosoma propinquum and Longipedia helgolandica. Marine Biology, 5, 341–44.Google Scholar
Frazer, J. H., 1936. The occurrence, ecology and life history of Tigriopus fulvas (Fischer). Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 20, 523–36.Google Scholar
Gilat, E., 1967. On the feeding of a benthonic copepod, Tigriopus brevicornis O. F. Müller. Bulletin of the Sea Fisheries Research Station, Israel, 45, 7995.Google Scholar
Hargrave, B. T. & Geen, G. H., 1968. Phosphorus excretion by zooplankton. Limnology and Oceanography, 13, 332–42.Google Scholar
Harris, E., 1959. The nitrogen cycle in Long Island Sound. BUletin of the Bingham Oceano-graphic Collection, Yale University, 17, 3165.Google Scholar
Harris, R. P., 1972. Reproductive activity of the interstitial copepods of a sandy beach. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 52, 507–24.Google Scholar
Igarashi, S., 1959. On the relationship between the environmental conditions of tide pool and the Tigriopus populations. Bulletin of the Marine Biological Station of Asamushi, 9, 167–71.Google Scholar
Ito, T., 1970. The biology of a harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus japonicus Mori. Journal of the Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Series VI, Zoology, 17, 474500.Google Scholar
Johannes, R. E., 1964. Phosphorus excretion and body size in marine animals: microzooplankton and nutrient regeneration. Science, 146, 923–4.Google Scholar
Khaylov, K. M. & Yerokhin, V. Y., 1971. Utilization of dissolved organic matter by the crustaceans Tigriopus brevicornis and Calanus finmarchicus. Oceanology, 11, 95103.Google Scholar
Koga, F., 1970. On the life history of Tigriopus japonicus Mori. (Copepoda). Journal of the Oceano-graphical Society of Japan, 26, 1121.Google Scholar
Lasker, R., 1966. Feeding, growth, respiration, and carbon utilization of a euphausiid crustacean. Journal of the Fisheries Research Board of Canada, 23, 1291–317.Google Scholar
Lasker, R., Wells, J. B. J. & Mcintyre, A. D., 1970. Growth, reproduction, respiration and carbon utilization of the sand-dwelling harpacticoid copepod, Asellopsis intermedia. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 50, 147–60.Google Scholar
Marshall, S. M. & Orr, A. P., 1956. On the biology of Calanus finmarchicus. IX. Feeding and digestion of the young stages. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 35, 587603.Google Scholar
Martin, J. H. 1968. Phytoplankton-zooplankton relationships in Narragansett Bay. III. Seasonal changes in zooplankton excretion rates in relation to phytoplankton abundance. Limnology and Oceanography, 13, 6371.Google Scholar
Mullin, M. M. & Brooks, E. R., 1967. Laboratory culture, growth rate, and feeding behaviour of a planktonic marine copepod. Limnology and Oceanography, 12, 657–66.Google Scholar
Mullin, M. M. & Brooks, E. R., 1970. Growth and metabolism of two planktonic marine copepods as influenced by temperature and type of food. In Marine Food Chains (ed. Steele, J. H.), pp. 7495. Edinburgh: Oliver and Boyd.Google Scholar
Murphy, J. & Riley, J. P., 1962. A modified single solution method for the determination of phosphate in natural waters. Analytica chimica acta, 27, 31–6.Google Scholar
Petipa, T. S., 1966. Oxygen consumption and food requirements in the copepods Acartia clausi Giesbrecht and A. latisetosa Kritcz [translated from the Russian]. From Zoologischeskii Zhurnal, 45, 363–70. (Fisheries Research Board of Canada Translation Series, no. 901, and Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food Translation, N.S. 90.)Google Scholar
Petipa, T. S., 1967. On the efficiency of utilization of energy in pelagic ecosystems of the Black Sea [translated from the Russian]. From Struktura i dinamika vodnykh soobshchestv i populyatsii, pp. 4464. Respublikanskii Mezhvedomstvennyi Sbornik, Seriya ‘Biologiya Morya’. Akademiya Nauk Ukrainskoi SSR. Published by ‘Naukova Dumka’, Kiev. (Fisheries Re-search Board of Canada Translation Series, no. 973.)Google Scholar
Pomeroy, R., Mathews, H. M. & Min, H. S., 1963. Excretion of phosphate and soluble organic phosphorus compounds by zooplankton. Limnology and Oceanography, 8, 50–5.Google Scholar
Provasoli, L., Shiriashi, K. & Lance, J. R., 1959. Nutritional idiosyncracies of Anemia and Tigriopus in monoxenic culture. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 77, 250–61.Google Scholar
Solorzano, L., 1969. Determination of ammonia in natural waters by the phenol hypochlorite method. Limnology and Oceanography, 4, 799801.Google Scholar
Takano, H., 1971. Breeding experiments of a marine littoral copepod Tigriopus japonicus Mori. Bulletin of the Tokai Regional Fisheries Research Laboratory, 64, 71–9.Google Scholar
Welch, H. E., 1968. Relationships between assimilation efficiencies and growth efficiencies for aquatic consumers. Ecology, 49, 755–59.Google Scholar
Wood, E. D., Armstrong, F. A. J. & Richards, F. A., 1967. Determination of nitrate in sea water by cadmium copper iodine reduction to nitrite. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 47, 2331.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 29 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 6th March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Feeding, Growth, Reproduction and Nitrogen Utilization by the Harpacticoid Copepod, Tigriopus Brevicornis
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Feeding, Growth, Reproduction and Nitrogen Utilization by the Harpacticoid Copepod, Tigriopus Brevicornis
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Feeding, Growth, Reproduction and Nitrogen Utilization by the Harpacticoid Copepod, Tigriopus Brevicornis
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *