Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-2h7tr Total loading time: 0.156 Render date: 2022-06-28T13:21:06.815Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Some views on speech perception

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 February 2009

Natalie Waterson
Affiliation:
(School of Oriental and African Studies, London)

Extract

Speech perception is of interest to linguists and psychologists alike. Psychologists seek for linguistic units to enable them to explain processes involved in speech; linguists try to establish what these units may be, whether distinctive features, phonemes, syllables, words or even larger units. Although the phoneme was for some time considered to be the most likely candidate, experimental evidence is increasingly pointing to some larger unit, particularly in view of the fact that no one-to-one acoustic correlation with the phoneme nor with distinctive features can be found (cf. Reddy, 1967: 336, Ladefoged, 1967: 146, Denes, 1963: 892). Furthermore, if the phoneme were to be the unit of perception, in any sort of processing involving matching a perceived pattern with one already stored, far too many operations would be involved because of the large size of vocabularies and large number of sentence types in a language; such processing would have to be too rapid to be feasible, bearing in mind the constraints of memory span. There is now more sympathy for the syllable or larger stretch as the unit of perception (e.g. Laver, 1970: 68, Maclay and Osgood, 1959, Ladefoged, 1959: 402), and there seems to be good evidence for the planning of speech to be in stretches longer than a word, e.g. Ladefoged's experiments with placing ‘dot’ at different parts of a sentence (Ladefoged, 1959).

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Journal of the International Phonetic Association 1971

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Bruce, D. J. (1956). ‘Effects of context upon the intelligibility of heard speech’, in Cherry, C. (ed.), Information theory: third London Symposium, 245252, Butterworth. Reprinted in R. C. Oldfield and J. C. Marshall, (eds.), Language, Penguin Modern Psychology, 1968.Google Scholar
Campbell, R., and Wales, R. (1970). ‘The study of language acquisition’, in Lyons, J. (ed.), New Horizons in Linguistics, 242260. Penguin Books.Google Scholar
Delattre, P. (1968). ‘From acoustic cues to distinctive features’, Phonetica. 18. 198230.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Denes, P. B. (1963). ‘On the statistics of spoken English’. JASA, 35.6., 892904.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Denes, P. B. and Pinson, E. N. (1963). The speech chain. Bell Telephone Laboratories.Google Scholar
Fillmore, C. J. (1968). ‘The case for case’, in Bach, E. and Harms, R. T. (eds.), Universals in linguistic theory, Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Google Scholar
Francis, H. (1971). An investigation into the structure and development of the speech, reading and writing of a young child. Thesis for Ph.D., Leeds University.Google Scholar
Fromkin, V. (1968). ‘Speculations on performance models’, J.L. 4.1., 4768.Google Scholar
Fry, D. B. (1956). ‘Perception and recognition in speech’, in Halle, M., Lunt, H. G., McLean, H., and Van Schooneveld, C. H. (eds.), For Roman Jakobson—Essays on the occasion of his 60th birthday, 169172.Google Scholar
Fry, D. B. (1970). ‘Speech perception and recognition’ in Lyons, J. (ed.), New Horizons in Linguistics, 2962.Google Scholar
Hörmann, H. (1971). Psycholinguistics. An introduction to research and theory. Berlin, etc.: Springer-Verlag.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ladefoged, P. (1959). ‘The perception of speech’. Proc. Symp. Mechanization of thought processes, 1. London: H.M. Stationery Office. 399409.Google Scholar
Ladefoged, P. (1967). Three areas of experimental phonetics. O.U.P.Google Scholar
Laver, J. (1970). ‘The production of speech’ in Lyons, J. (ed.), New Horizons in Linguistics, 5375.Google Scholar
MaClay, H., and Osgood, C. E. (1959). ‘Hesitation phenomena in spontaneous English speech’, Word. 15. 1944.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Malécot, A. (1968). ‘The force of articulation of American stops and fricatives as a function of position’, Phonetica 18. 95102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miller, G. A. and Nicely, P. E. (1955), ‘An analysis of perceptual confusions among some English consonants’, JASA. 27. 338–52. Reprinted in Sol Saporta (ed.) Psycholinguistics. A book of readings.(1961). 153–175. Holt, Rinehart and Winston.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peters, R. W. (1963). ‘Dimensions of perception for consonants’, JASA, 35. 12. 1985–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Piaget, J. (1959), reprint 1967. The language and thought of the child. Transl. M., and Gabain, R.. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
Reddy, D. R. (1967). ‘Computer recognition of connected speech’, JASA, 42.2. 329–247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robins, R. H. (1967). A short history of linguistics. Longmans.Google Scholar
Savin, H. B. (1963). ‘Word-frequency effect and errors in the perception of speech’, JASA, 35.2. 200206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Waterson, N. (1971). ‘Child phonology: a prosodic view’, J.L. 7.2.Google Scholar
Waterson, N. (1970). ‘Some speech forms of an English child: a phonological study’, TPS (Forthcoming).Google Scholar
Wickelgren, W. A. (1965). ‘Distinctive features and errors in Short-Term Memory for English vowels’, JASA, 38.4. 583588.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wickelgren, W. A. (1966). ‘Distinctive features and errors in Short-Term Memory for English consonants; JASA, 39.2. 388398.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wells, G. (1970). ‘Some suggestions for the theoretical orientation of research on language acquisition’. Paper given at the annual conference of the British Psychological Society, Education Section, at Nottingham.Google Scholar
5
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Some views on speech perception
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Some views on speech perception
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Some views on speech perception
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *