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Personality characteristics and affective status related to cognitive test performance and gender in patients with memory complaints

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 October 2007

SUSANNA VESTBERG
Affiliation:
Division of Psychogeriatrics, Dept of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden
ULLA PASSANT
Affiliation:
Division of Psychogeriatrics, Dept of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden
JARL RISBERG
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden
CHRISTINA ELFGREN
Affiliation:
Division of Psychogeriatrics, Dept of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Sweden

Abstract

The aims are to study personality characteristics of patients with memory complaints and to assess the presence of objective (OMI) versus subjective (SMI) memory impairment, the affective status, as well as potential gender differences. The patients were assessed by means of a neuropsychiatric examination and a neuropsychological test-battery. The Swedish version of the revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were used. The 57 patients (38 women, 19 men, mean age 56.9) differed from the Swedish normative group in three of the five personality factors: neuroticism, extraversion and agreeableness. This was mainly because of the scores of the female patients. Approximately half of the patients had OMI. No differences regarding personality factors or affective status were found between OMI and SMI patients. The female patients scored significantly higher than the male patients on symptoms of anxiety and depression. Neuroticism and symptoms of depression interacted with memory performance and gender. Our findings demonstrate the importance of applying an objective assessment of memory functions and a gender perspective when studying patients with memory complaints. (JINS, 2007, 13, 911–919.)

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2007 The International Neuropsychological Society

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