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Pediatric Perceived Cognitive Functioning: Psychometric Properties and Normative Data of the Dutch Item Bank and Short Form

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2019

Jan Pieter Marchal*
Affiliation:
Pediatric Psychosocial Department, Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam UMC University Medical Centers, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands Research Priority Area Yield, University of Amsterdam, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Marieke de Vries
Affiliation:
Pediatric Psychosocial Department, Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam UMC University Medical Centers, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands Research Priority Area Yield, University of Amsterdam, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands School of Psychology, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Semenyih 43500, Malaysia
Judith Conijn
Affiliation:
Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, 1001NG Amsterdam, The Netherlands
André B Rietman
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Surgery and Intensive Care, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam 3015GD, The Netherlands
Hanneke IJsselstijn
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Surgery and Intensive Care, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam 3015GD, The Netherlands
Dick Tibboel
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatric Surgery and Intensive Care, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children’s Hospital, Rotterdam 3015GD, The Netherlands
Lotte Haverman
Affiliation:
Pediatric Psychosocial Department, Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam UMC University Medical Centers, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Heleen Maurice-Stam
Affiliation:
Pediatric Psychosocial Department, Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam UMC University Medical Centers, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Kim J Oostrom
Affiliation:
Pediatric Psychosocial Department, Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam UMC University Medical Centers, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands Research Priority Area Yield, University of Amsterdam, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Martha A Grootenhuis
Affiliation:
Pediatric Psychosocial Department, Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam UMC University Medical Centers, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands Research Priority Area Yield, University of Amsterdam, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht 3584CS, The Netherlands
*
*Correspondence and reprint requests to: Jan Pieter Marchal, Meibergdreef 9, Room G8-136, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands, (+31)20 566 5674. E-mail: j.p.marchal@amc.uva.nl

Abstract

Objective:

With increasing numbers of children growing up with conditions that are associated with acquired brain injury, efficient neuropsychological screening for cognitive deficits is pivotal. Brief self-report measures concerning daily complaints can play an important role in such screening. We translated and adapted the pediatric perceived cognitive functioning (PedsPCF) self- and parent-report item bank to Dutch. This study presents (1) psychometric properties, (2) a new short form, and (3) normative data for the short form.

Methods:

A general population sample of children and parents was recruited. Dimensionality of the PedsPCF was assessed using confirmatory factor analyses and exploratory bifactor analyses. Item response theory (IRT) modeling was used to evaluate model fit of the PedsPCF, to identify differential item functioning (DIF), and to select items for the short form. To select short-form items, we also considered the neuropsychological content of items.

Results:

In 1441 families, a parent and/or child participated (response rate 66% at family level). Assessed psychometric properties were satisfactory and the predominantly unidimensional factor structure of the PedsPCF allowed for IRT modeling using the graded response model. One item showed meaningful DIF. For the short form, 10 items were selected.

Conclusions:

In this first study of the PedsPCF outside the United States, studied psychometric properties of the translated PedsPCF were satisfactory, and allowed for IRT modeling. Based on the IRT analyses and the content of items, we proposed a new 10-item short form. Further research should determine the relation of PedsPCF outcomes with neurocognitive measures and its ability to facilitate neuropsychological screening in clinical practice.

Type
Regular Research
Copyright
Copyright © INS. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2019. 

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Footnotes

Jan Pieter Marchal and Marieke de Vries are co-first authors.

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