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Longitudinal outcomes of very low birth weight: Neuropsychological findings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2004

H. GERRY TAYLOR
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University and Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio
NORI M. MINICH
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University and Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio
NANCY KLEIN
Affiliation:
Department of Special Education, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, Ohio
MAUREEN HACK
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University and Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio

Abstract

To investigate the effects of very low birth weight (VLBW, <1500 g) on the development of neuropsychological skills, we assessed 67 children with birth weight <750 g, 64 with birth weight 750–1499 g, and 67 term-born controls. Growth modeling of raw scores from mean ages 7–14 years revealed persistent VLBW sequelae. Even when adjusting for IQ, the <750 g group scored more poorly than the term-born group on measures of language processing, verbal list learning, and perceptual–motor and organizational abilities. This group also made slower age-related progress than the control group on tests of perceptual-motor and executive functions. Environmental factors moderated group differences in change on other cognitive measures. These results revealed further evidence for slower skill development in both VLBW groups relative to controls, as well as“catch-up” growth in the 750–1499 g group on some measures. The findings suggest age-related changes in the cognitive sequelae of VLBW that depend on the skill assessed, the degree of VLBW, and environmental factors. (JINS, 2004, 10, 149–163.)

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2004 The International Neuropsychological Society

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