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Do antisaccade deficits in schizophrenia provide evidence of a specific inhibitory function?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 October 2006

GARY DONOHOE
Affiliation:
Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Department of Psychiatry, & Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
RICHARD REILLY
Affiliation:
School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, and Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory, St. Vincent's Hospital Fairview, Dublin, Ireland
SARAH CLARKE
Affiliation:
Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Department of Psychiatry, & Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
STEPHEN MEREDITH
Affiliation:
School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, and Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory, St. Vincent's Hospital Fairview, Dublin, Ireland
BARRY GREEN
Affiliation:
School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, and Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory, St. Vincent's Hospital Fairview, Dublin, Ireland
DEREK MORRIS
Affiliation:
Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Department of Psychiatry, & Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
MICHAEL GILL
Affiliation:
Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Department of Psychiatry, & Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
AIDEN CORVIN
Affiliation:
Neuropsychiatric Genetics Research Group, Department of Psychiatry, & Institute of Molecular Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
HUGH GARAVAN
Affiliation:
Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
IAN H. ROBERTSON
Affiliation:
Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland

Abstract

Background: Despite its inhibitory control requirements, antisaccade deficits have been consistently associated with working memory impairments in schizophrenia. We investigated whether variance in antisaccade performance could be better accounted for in terms of a specific inhibitory function. Method: We assessed 48 clinically stable out-patients with schizophrenia on an antisaccade task, as well as on measures of spatial and verbal working memory, sustained selective attention, and a simple motoric go/no-go measure of response inhibition. Results: In a stepwise multiple regression analysis, go/no-go task performance accounted for a considerably greater percentage of variance in antisaccade performance (25.3%) than either working memory (8.4%) or sustained selective attention task (9.1%). Discussion: We conclude that antisaccade deficits in schizophrenia appear to be better understood in terms of a specific deficit of inhibitory control than in terms of more general difficulties with context maintenance or goal neglect. (JINS, 2006, 12, 901–906.)

Type
BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS
Copyright
© 2006 The International Neuropsychological Society

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