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Chronic Postconcussion Symptoms and Functional Outcomes in OEF/OIF Veterans with Self-Report of Blast Exposure

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 October 2012

Mieke Verfaellie*
Affiliation:
Memory Disorders Research Center, VA Boston Healthcare System and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
Ginette Lafleche
Affiliation:
Memory Disorders Research Center, VA Boston Healthcare System and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
Avron Spiro III
Affiliation:
Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, VA Boston Healthcare System and Boston University Schools of Public Health and Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
Carlos Tun
Affiliation:
Polytrauma Network Site, VA Boston Healthcare System and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts
Kathryn Bousquet
Affiliation:
Memory Disorders Research Center, VA Boston Healthcare System and Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Mieke Verfaellie, Memory Disorders Research Center (151A), VA Boston Healthcare System, 150 S Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02130. E-mail: verf@bu.edu

Abstract

Postconcussion symptoms (PCS) and functional outcomes were evaluated in 91 OEF/OIF outpatient veterans with reported histories of blast-exposure, with the goal of evaluating (1) the association between these outcomes and a clinical diagnosis of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) with or without loss of consciousness (LOC); and (2) the influence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression on PCS reporting and perceived functional limitations. Individuals who reported mTBI with LOC had greater PCS complaints than individuals who reported mTBI without LOC or individuals without mTBI. However, after adjusting for severity of PTSD and depression symptoms, this group difference disappeared. Functional limitations were particularly prominent in the psychosocial domain. Again, PTSD was significantly associated with functional outcomes, but the mTBI with LOC group had greater psychosocial limitations than the other two groups, even when PTSD and depression symptoms were taken into account. These findings highlight the role of mental health in both outcomes, but additionally point to the impact of mTBI with LOC on long-term psychosocial adjustment. (JINS, 2013, 19, 1–10)

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The International Neuropsychological Society 2012

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Chronic Postconcussion Symptoms and Functional Outcomes in OEF/OIF Veterans with Self-Report of Blast Exposure
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