Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-w5x57 Total loading time: 0.505 Render date: 2022-07-01T20:14:12.928Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Brain structural and cognitive correlates of clock drawing performance in Alzheimer's disease

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 1999

DEBORAH A. CAHN-WEINER
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA Psychiatry Research, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA
EDITH V. SULLIVAN
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
PAULA K. SHEAR
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA Department of Psychology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
ROSEMARY FAMA
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA Psychiatry Research, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA
KELVIN O. LIM
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA Psychiatry Research, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA
JEROME A. YESAVAGE
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA Psychiatry Research, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA
JARED R. TINKLENBERG
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA Psychiatry Research, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA
ADOLF PFEFFERBAUM
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA Neuropsychiatry Program, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA

Abstract

The Clock Drawing Test (CDT) is widely used in the assessment of dementia and is known to be sensitive to the detection of deficits in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). CDT performance is dependent not only on visuospatial and constructional abilities, but also on conceptual and executive functioning; therefore, it is likely to be mediated by multiple brain regions. The purpose of the present study was to identify component cognitive processes and regional cortical volumes that contribute to CDT performance in AD. In 29 patients with probable AD, CDT performance was significantly related to right-, but not left-hemisphere, regional gray matter volume. Specifically, CDT score correlated significantly with the right anterior and posterior superior temporal lobe volumes. CDT scores showed significant relationships with tests of semantic knowledge, executive function, and visuoconstruction, and receptive language. These results suggest that in AD patients, CDT performance is attributable to impairment in multiple cognitive domains but is related specifically to regional volume loss of right temporal cortex. (JINS, 1999, 5, 502–509.)

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1999 The International Neuropsychological Society

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
59
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Brain structural and cognitive correlates of clock drawing performance in Alzheimer's disease
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Brain structural and cognitive correlates of clock drawing performance in Alzheimer's disease
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Brain structural and cognitive correlates of clock drawing performance in Alzheimer's disease
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *