Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-558cb97cc8-s4zlt Total loading time: 0.325 Render date: 2022-10-07T20:33:07.083Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

HISTORY OF ECONOMICS OR A SELECTED HISTORY OF ECONOMICS?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2008

Abstract

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Mini-symposium on the Future of History of Economics: Young Scholars' Perspective
Copyright
Copyright © The History of Economics Society 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

Arrow, K. 2001. “The Five Most Significant Developments in Economics of the Twentieth Century.” The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought 8 (3): pp. 298–304.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Backhouse, R. E. 2003. “The Stabilization of Price Theory, 1920-1955.” In Biddle, Jeff, Davis, John B. and Samuels, Warren J., eds., A Companion to the History of Economic Thought, Blackwell. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, pp. 308–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blanchard, O. 2000. “What Do We Know About Macroeconomics that Fisher and Wicksell Did Not?Quarterly Journal of Economics 115 (4): 1375–1409.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blaug, M. 2001. “No History of Ideas Please, We're Economists.” Journal of Economic Perspectives 15 (1): 145–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boulding, K. 1971. “After Samuelson, Who Needs Adam Smith?History of Political Economy 3 (2): 225–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hoover, K. 1988. The New Classical Macroeconomics: A Sceptical Inquiry. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
Leijonhufvud, A. 2006. “The Uses of the Past.” Working Paper, University of Trento.Google Scholar
Lodewijks, J. 2003. “Research in the History of Economic Thought as a Vehicle for the Defence and Criticism of Orthodox Economics.” In Biddle, Jeff, Davis, John B. and Samuels, Warren J., eds., A Companion to the History of Economic Thought. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, pp. 655–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Louçã, F. 2004. “Swinging All the Way: The Education of Doctor Lucas and Foes.” History of Political Economy 36 (4): 689–734.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McCloskey, D. 1998. The Rhetoric of Economics, 2nd edition. Madison, WI: Wisconsin University Press.Google Scholar
Moscati, I. 2008. “More Economics, Please: We're Historians of Economics.” Journal of the History of Economic Thought 30 (1): pp. 85–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robbins, L. 1932. An Essay on the Nature and Significance of Economic Science. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
Santayana, G. 1905. The Life of Reason: or, the Phases of Human Progress, Vol. 1. Reason in Common Sense. New York: Dover Publications, Inc., 1980.Google Scholar
Samuelson, P. and Barnett, W. 2007. Inside the Economist's Mind: Conversations with Eminent Economists. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.Google Scholar
Sent, Esther-Mirjam. 1999. “The Randomness of Rational Expectations: A Perspective on Sargent's Early Incentives.” The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought 6 (3): pp. 439–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schabas, M. 1992. “Breaking Away: History of Economics as History of Science.” History of Political Economy 24 (1): 187–203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weintraub, E. Roy. 2002. “Will Economics Ever Have a Past Again?History of Political Economy 34 (Annual Supplement): pp. 1–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weintraub, E. Roy. 2006. Economic Science Wars. Jérome A. Blanqui Lecture. Available athttp://www.eshet.net/best/1150129153__blanqui_lecture.pdf.Google Scholar
Weintraub, E. Roy. 2007. “Economic Science Wars.” Journal of the History of Economic Thought 29 (3): 267–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

HISTORY OF ECONOMICS OR A SELECTED HISTORY OF ECONOMICS?
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

HISTORY OF ECONOMICS OR A SELECTED HISTORY OF ECONOMICS?
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

HISTORY OF ECONOMICS OR A SELECTED HISTORY OF ECONOMICS?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *