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Adapting Very Brief Advice (VBA) on smoking for use in low-resource settings: experience from the FRESH AIR project

  • Andy McEwen (a1), Jill Pooler (a2), Christos Lionis (a3), Sophia Papadakis (a3) (a4), Ioanna Tsiligianni (a3), Marilena Anastasaki (a3), Pham Le An (a5), Nguyen Nhu Vinh (a5), Pham Duong Uyen Binh (a5), Nguyĕn Nhật Quỳnh (a5), Trãn Diêp Tuãn (a5), Sooronbaev Talant (a6), Aizhamal Tabyshova (a6), Alina Beyshenbekova (a6), Nuriddin Marazhapov (a6) and Ulan Sheraliev (a6)...

Abstract

Introduction

Very Brief Advice (VBA) on smoking is an evidence-based intervention and a recommended clinical practice for all healthcare professionals in the UK.

Aims

We report on experience from the FRESH AIR project in adapting the VBA model and training in three low-resource settings: Greece, Vietnam and Kyrgyzstan.

Methods

Using a participatory research process, UK experts and local stakeholders conducted an environmental scan and needs assessment to examine the VBA intervention model, training materials and recommend adaptations to the local context. Two VBA training sessions were piloted in each country to inform adaptation. A final training tool kit was developed in the local language.

Results

In each country, the VBA on smoking intervention model remained primarily intact. The lack of a formal smoking cessation system to refer motivated clients in two countries required adaptation of the ACT component of the model. A range of local adaptations to the training resources were made in all three countries to ensure cultural appropriateness as well as enhance key messages including expanding training on nicotine addiction, second-hand smoke and pharmacotherapy.

Conclusions

Implementation of VBA requires sensitive, collaborative, local and cultural adaptation if it is to be achieved successfully.

Trial registration

Trial ID# NTR5759

Critical appraisal tools

The Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies (StaRI) statement: https://www.equator-network.org/reporting-guidelines/stari-statement/

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

Author for correspondence: Andy McEwen, E-mail: andy.mcewen@ncsct.co.uk

References

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