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Dosimetric impacts on skin toxicity for patients using topical agents and dressings during radiotherapy

  • Karen Tse (a1), Lyndon Morley (a1), Angela Cashell (a1) (a2), Annette Sperduti (a1), Maurene McQuestion (a1) (a3) and James C. L. Chow (a1) (a2)...

Abstract

Background and purpose

Skin care practices for radiotherapy patients are complicated by dosimetric concerns. This study measures the effect on skin dose of various topical agents and dressings.

Materials and methods

Superficial doses were measured under 17 topical agents and dressings and three clinical materials for reference. Dose was measured using a MOSFET detector under a 1 mm polymethyl methacrylate slab, with 6 MV photon beams at 100 cm source to surface distance.

Results

Relative skin dose under reference materials was 128% (thermoplastic mask), 158% (5 mm bolus) and 171% (10 mm bolus). Under a realistic application of topical agent (0·5 mm), relative skin doses were 106–111%. All dry dressings yielded relative dose of ≤111%; two wet dressings yielded higher relative doses (133 and 141%).

Conclusions

Under clinically relevant conditions, no cream, gel or dry dressing increased the skin dose beyond that seen with a thermoplastic mask. Dressings soaked with water produced less skin dose than 5 mm bolus. This may be unacceptable if wet dressings are in place for the majority of the treatment course. Our results suggest that skin care practices should not be limited by dosimetric concerns when using a 6 MV photon beam.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence to: Lyndon Morley, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada. Tel: 416-946-4501. Fax: 416-946-2019. E-mail: lyndon.morley@rmp.uhn.on.ca

References

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Keywords

Dosimetric impacts on skin toxicity for patients using topical agents and dressings during radiotherapy

  • Karen Tse (a1), Lyndon Morley (a1), Angela Cashell (a1) (a2), Annette Sperduti (a1), Maurene McQuestion (a1) (a3) and James C. L. Chow (a1) (a2)...

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