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Performance investigation of a high-temperature and power Hall-effect electric propulsion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 November 2019

Lai Li
Affiliation:
College of Astronautics, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016, China
Xi Lu
Affiliation:
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Deep Space Exploration Technology, Shanghai 201109, China
Wei Wang
Affiliation:
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Deep Space Exploration Technology, Shanghai 201109, China
Guiping Zhu
Affiliation:
College of Astronautics, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016, China
Hulin Huang
Affiliation:
College of Astronautics, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016, China
Xidong Zhang
Affiliation:
College of Energy and Power Engineering, Nanjing Institute of Technology, Nanjing 211167, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

This paper discusses a detailed computational analysis that illustrated the influences of the magnetic field and external potential on the performance of a high-temperature Hall-effect electric thruster. Uniform and non-uniform magnetic field configurations were examined. The Lorentz force in the $x$ direction, acting on the plasma, was shown to substantially enhance the flow velocity in the non-uniform magnetic field, which indicated that the non-uniform magnetic field was more suitable for Hall-effect electromagnetic acceleration. The static temperature increased with the external potential, especially near the region of cathode. This increment in gas temperature, together with the effect of the Lorentz force, results in the enhancement of the velocity at the front and back of the cathode. However, the Mach number and gas density decreased due to static temperature increases caused by the conversion of more electric power into internal energy. The thrust increased eventually with the increase of the average exit velocity.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2019 

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Performance investigation of a high-temperature and power Hall-effect electric propulsion
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