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Morphometrics of Catenipora (Tabulata; Upper Ordovician; southern Manitoba, Canada)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 May 2016

Boo-Young Bae
Affiliation:
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Andong National University, Andong 760-749, Korea
Robert J. Elias
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences, The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada
Dong-Jin Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Andong National University, Andong 760-749, Korea

Abstract

Multivariate analytical methods, which have been used effectively in work on scleractinian corals, were applied to tabulate corals. The study involved discrimination and characterization of closely related species of Catenipora from the Selkirk Member, Red River Formation, in Manitoba. Ten morphological characters measured in transverse sections of 37 coralla were tested to perform cluster analyses. Results of correlation analysis and principal component analysis indicated that five of the characters would be suitable: tabularium area, corallite length, corallite width, tabularium length, and tabularium width.

A cluster analysis was performed on the raw data matrix coordinated with 37 coralla by the five selected morphological characters. The characters were standardized to mean 0 and variance 1, and squared Euclidean distances among the coralla were calculated. The unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic average was also employed for clustering the coralla. Four morphospecies were consequently extracted from the dendrogram, which was based on the variation of the five morphological characters, and were confirmed by two types of discriminant analysis. Morphospecies A, B, and D have distinctive ranges in variation of all characters except corallite length. Morphospecies C appears to be an intermediate form, in which the ranges of variation of all five morphological characters partially overlap with those of morphospecies A and/or B.

Another cluster analysis, including eight type specimens of Ordovician species previously reported from Manitoba, was performed on the data matrix coordinated with 45 coralla by the five morphological characters. Based on this analysis and morphological comparisons, morphospecies A–C are identified as C. rubra Sinclair and Bolton in Sinclair, 1955, C. foerstei Nelson, 1963, and C. robusta (Wilson, 1926) of Nelson, 1963 (=C. cf. robusta herein), respectively. Morphospecies D is equated with both C. agglomeratiformis (Whitfield, 1900) of Nelson, 1963 and C. aequabilis (Teichert, 1937) of Nelson, 1963 (=C. cf. agglomeratiformis herein). The result of cluster analysis based on the five selected morphological characters demonstrates efficiency in distinguishing closely related species of Catenipora from southern Manitoba. The same procedure should also be applicable to other cateniform corals.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 

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