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Racial and ethnic differences in predictors of vitamin D among pregnant women in south-eastern USA

  • Devika Chawla (a1), Julie L. Daniels (a1), Sara E. Benjamin-Neelon (a2), Bernard F. Fuemmeler (a3), Cathrine Hoyo (a4) and Jessie P. Buckley (a5)...

Abstract

Insufficient vitamin D during pregnancy increases risk of adverse outcomes, with known differences by race/ethnicity. We sought to determine whether predictors of vitamin D insufficiency vary by race/ethnicity in an ethnically diverse pregnancy cohort. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and patient characteristics were measured at first prenatal visit to prenatal clinics in south-eastern USA between 2009 and 2011 (n 504). Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95 % CI were estimated using multivariable regression to quantify predictors of vitamin D insufficiency, overall and by race/ethnicity. In race/ethnicity-stratified models, season was most associated with vitamin D insufficiency among non-Hispanic white women; PR for winter v. summer were 3·58 (95 % CI 1·64, 7·81) for non-Hispanic white, 1·52 (95 % CI 1·18, 1·95) for Hispanic and 1·14 (95 % CI 0·99, 1·30) for non-Hispanic black women. Although women with darker skin tones are most vulnerable to prenatal vitamin D insufficiency, season may be more strongly associated with insufficiency among women with lighter skin tones.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: Jessie P. Buckley, email Jessie.Buckley@jhu.edu

References

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Keywords

Racial and ethnic differences in predictors of vitamin D among pregnant women in south-eastern USA

  • Devika Chawla (a1), Julie L. Daniels (a1), Sara E. Benjamin-Neelon (a2), Bernard F. Fuemmeler (a3), Cathrine Hoyo (a4) and Jessie P. Buckley (a5)...

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