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A period of 10 weeks of increased protein consumption does not alter faecal microbiota or volatile metabolites in healthy older men: a randomised controlled trial

  • S. M. Mitchell (a1) (a2), E. J. McKenzie (a3), C. J. Mitchell (a1) (a4), A. M. Milan (a1) (a5) (a6), N. Zeng (a1), R. F. D'Souza (a1) (a7) (a8), F. Ramzan (a1), P. Sharma (a1), E. Rettedal (a5), S. O. Knowles (a5), N. C. Roy (a1) (a2) (a5) (a6), A. Sjödin (a9), K.-H. Wagner (a10), J. M. O'Sullivan (a1) and D. Cameron-Smith (a1) (a2) (a11)...

Abstract

Diet has a major influence on the composition and metabolic output of the gut microbiome. Higher-protein diets are often recommended for older consumers; however, the effect of high-protein diets on the gut microbiota and faecal volatile organic compounds (VOC) of elderly participants is unknown. The purpose of the study was to establish if the faecal microbiota composition and VOC in older men are different after a diet containing the recommended dietary intake (RDA) of protein compared with a diet containing twice the RDA (2RDA). Healthy males (74⋅2 (sd 3⋅6) years; n 28) were randomised to consume the RDA of protein (0⋅8 g protein/kg body weight per d) or 2RDA, for 10 weeks. Dietary protein was provided via whole foods rather than supplementation or fortification. The diets were matched for dietary fibre from fruit and vegetables. Faecal samples were collected pre- and post-intervention for microbiota profiling by 16S ribosomal RNA amplicon sequencing and VOC analysis by head space/solid-phase microextraction/GC-MS. After correcting for multiple comparisons, no significant differences in the abundance of faecal microbiota or VOC associated with protein fermentation were evident between the RDA and 2RDA diets. Therefore, in the present study, a twofold difference in dietary protein intake did not alter gut microbiota or VOC indicative of altered protein fermentation.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: D. Cameron-Smith, email d.cameron-smith@auckland.ac.nz

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A period of 10 weeks of increased protein consumption does not alter faecal microbiota or volatile metabolites in healthy older men: a randomised controlled trial

  • S. M. Mitchell (a1) (a2), E. J. McKenzie (a3), C. J. Mitchell (a1) (a4), A. M. Milan (a1) (a5) (a6), N. Zeng (a1), R. F. D'Souza (a1) (a7) (a8), F. Ramzan (a1), P. Sharma (a1), E. Rettedal (a5), S. O. Knowles (a5), N. C. Roy (a1) (a2) (a5) (a6), A. Sjödin (a9), K.-H. Wagner (a10), J. M. O'Sullivan (a1) and D. Cameron-Smith (a1) (a2) (a11)...

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