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Long-term follow-up after weight management in obese cats*

  • Gabrielle Deagle (a1), Shelley L. Holden (a1), Vincent Biourge (a2), Penelope J. Morris (a3) and Alexander J. German (a1)...

Abstract

Feline obesity is a prevalent medical disease and the main therapeutic strategy is dietary energy restriction. However, at present there are no data regarding long-term outcome in this species. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if, as in other species, some cats regain weight following successful weight loss, and to identify any influencing factors in a cohort of client-owned cats with naturally occurring obesity. Twenty-six cats were included, all of which had successfully completed a weight management programme. After weight loss, cats were periodically monitored. The median duration of follow-up was 954 d (72–2162 d). Ten cats (39 %) maintained their completion weight (±5 %), four (15 %) lost >5 % additional weight and 12 (46 %) gained >5 % weight. Seven of the rebounding cats (58 %) regained over 50 % of their original weight lost. Older cats were less likely to regain weight than younger cats (P = 0·024); with an approximately linear negative association between the cat's age and the amount of weight regained (Kendall's τ = −0·340, P = 0·016). Furthermore, cats whose energy intake during weight loss was greater were also more likely to regain weight (P = 0·023). When the characteristics of weight regain in cats were compared with those from a similar cohort of dogs, cats that rebounded were more likely to regain >50 % of the weight they had lost. These results suggest that weight regain, after successful weight loss, is common in obese cats, and that young cats (<7 years of age) are most at risk.

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Copyright

The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license .

Corresponding author

Corresponding author: A. J. German, fax + 44 151 795 6101, email ajgerman@liv.ac.uk

Footnotes

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*

This article was published as part of the WALTHAM International Nutritional Sciences Symposium Proceedings 2013.

Footnotes

References

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1. German, AJ (2006) The growing problem of obesity in dogs and cats. J Nutr 136, 1940S1946S.
2. German, AJ, Holden, SL, Bissot, T, et al. (2008) Changes in body composition during weight loss in obese client-owned cats: loss of lean tissue mass correlates with overall percentage of weight lost. J Feline Med Surg 10, 452459.
3. Mann, T, Tomiyama, J, Westling, E, et al. (2007) Medicare's search for effective obesity treatments: diets are not the answer. Am Psychol 62, 220233.
4. Astrup, A, Gotzsche, PC, van de Werken, K, et al. (1999) Meta-analysis of resting metabolic rate in formerly obese subjects. Am J Clin Nutr 69, 11171122.
5. Weinsier, RL, Nagy, TR, Hunter, GR, et al. (2000) Do adaptive changes in metabolic rate favor weight regain in weight-reduced individuals? An examination of the set-point theory. Am J Clin Nutr 72, 10881094.
6. German, AJ, Holden, SL, Mather, NJ, et al. (2011) Low maintenance energy requirements of dogs after weight loss. J Nutr 106, S93S96.
7. Laflamme, DP & Kuhlman, G (1995) The effect of weight loss regimen on subsequent weight maintenance in dogs. Nutr Res 15, 10191028.
8. German, AJ, Holden, SL, Morris, PJ, et al. (2012) Long-term follow-up after weight management in obese dogs: the role of diet in preventing weight regain. Vet J 192, 6570.
9. Villeverde, C, Ramsey, JJ, Green, AS, et al. (2008) Energy restriction results in a mass-adjusted decrease in energy expenditure in cats that is maintained after weight regain. J Nutr 138, 856860.
10. Lund, EM, Armstrong, PJ, Kirk, CA & Klausner, JS (2005) Prevalence and risk factors for obesity in adult cats from private US veterinary practices. Int J Appl Res Vet Med 3, 8896.
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13. German, AJ, Holden, SL, Bissot, T, et al. (2009) Use of starting condition score to estimate changes in bodyweight and composition during weight loss in obese dogs. Res Vet Sci 87, 249254.

Keywords

Long-term follow-up after weight management in obese cats*

  • Gabrielle Deagle (a1), Shelley L. Holden (a1), Vincent Biourge (a2), Penelope J. Morris (a3) and Alexander J. German (a1)...

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