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Different patterns of Australian adults' knowledge of foods and nutrients related to metabolic disease risk

  • Anthony Worsley (a1), Wei C. Wang (a1), Stephanie Byrne (a1) and Heather Yeatman (a2)

Abstract

A nationwide survey of 2022 consumers was conducted in Australia in late 2011. A short list of questions about knowledge of the nutrient composition of common foods was administered along with questions about the respondents' food attitudes, demographics, school education and dieting practices. Overall, the results showed that nutrition knowledge was relatively high. Latent class analysis showed two groups of consumers with ‘high’ and ‘low’ knowledge of nutrition. Higher knowledge was positively associated with age, female sex, university education, experience of home economics or health education at school, having a chronic disease, and attitudes to food issues, and negatively with type 1 diabetes or the use of diabetes-control diets. The implications of the findings for nutrition communication are discussed.

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Copyright

The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license .

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Dr Anthony Worsley, fax +61 3 9244 6910, email tonyw@deakin.edu.au

References

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