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High-Fidelity Finite Element Modeling and Analysis of Adaptive Gas Turbine Stator-Rotor Flow Interaction at Off-Design Conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 August 2020

Nikita Kozak
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011, USA
Fei Xu
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011, USA Ansys Inc., Austin, Texas 78746, USA
Manoj R. Rajanna
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011, USA
Luis Bravo
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005, USA
Muthuvel Murugan
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005, USA
Anindya Ghoshal
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Research Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005, USA
Yuri Bazilevs
Affiliation:
School of Engineering, Brown University Providence, Rhode Island 02912, USA
Ming-Chen Hsu
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The objective of this work is to computationally investigate the impact of an incidence-tolerant rotor blade concept on gas turbine engine performance under off-design conditions. When a gas turbine operates at an off-design condition such as hover flight or takeoff, large-scale flow separation can occur around turbine blades, which causes performance degradation, excessive noise, and critical loss of operability. To alleviate this shortcoming, a novel concept which articulates the rotating turbine blades simultaneous with the stator vanes is explored. We use a finite-element-based moving-domain computational fluid dynamics (CFD) framework to model a single high-pressure turbine stage. The rotor speeds investigated range from 100% down to 50% of the designed condition of 44,700 rpm. This study explores the limits of rotor blade articulation angles and determines the maximal performance benefits in terms of turbine output power and adiabatic efficiency. The results show articulating rotor blades can achieve an efficiency gain of 10% at off-design conditions thereby providing critical leap-ahead design capabilities for the U.S. Army Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program.

Type
Research Article
Creative Commons
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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High-Fidelity Finite Element Modeling and Analysis of Adaptive Gas Turbine Stator-Rotor Flow Interaction at Off-Design Conditions
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