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Study on an Improved Shock Absorber Used in the Oil Test Pipe Under Impact Load

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2011

Y. X. Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074, P.R.China
Z. J. Cui
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074, P.R.China
H. P. Hu
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074, P.R.China
C. C. Yin
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074, P.R.China
C. Y. Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074, P.R.China
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Abstract

Performance of an improved shock absorber designed for absorbing and isolating the oil test pipe vibration is researched in this paper. 3D finite element model is established for the analysis of the shock absorber system accurately by the FEA software ANSYS/LS-DYNA. Numerical simulations show that the effect of the shock absorber can be greatly improved by optimizing the plastic material parameter. In the practice petroleum well test, the new designed shock absorber showed good shock absorption effect and no damage on the detecting instruments was observed even after ten times loading.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, R.O.C. 2008

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