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Finite Element Analysis of Screw-Plate Systems for Fixation of Parasymphyseal Fractures of the Mandible

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2011

Scott T. Lovald
Affiliation:
Manufacturing Engineering Program, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Tariq Khraishi
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
John Wood
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Jon Wagner
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
Bret Baack
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
James Kelly
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
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Abstract

Finite Element Modeling was used to compare the efficacy of common screw-plate configurations used for fixation of parasymphyseal fractures of the mandible. Measures of Von Mises stress on the screw bone interface, as well as principal strain in the reduced fracture region, were used in this comparison. This study also explored differences between orthotropic and isotropic modeling practices and compared the effect of mastication forces on both the fractured and intact halves of the mandible. The results of this analysis showed no major differences between configurations from a mechanistic point of view. This suggests that the use of any of the studied screw-plate configurations will not increase chances for post-operative complications. Furthermore, little difference is seen between analyses with either orthotropic or isotropic material properties. The inclusion of orthotropic properties can thus be avoided in future studies with similar boundary and plating conditions. Mastication ipsilateral to the fracture increases Von Mises stress 2 to 4 times, and should be avoided during early healing periods. These recommendations only apply to patients whose fractures mimic the finite-element model.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, R.O.C. 2007

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Finite Element Analysis of Screw-Plate Systems for Fixation of Parasymphyseal Fractures of the Mandible
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